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Fragmentation by Design: Architecture, Finance, and Identity

Fragmentation by Design: Architecture, Finance, and Identity Billboard landscapes in Gurgaon, India, 2008. Photo by Rohan Kalyan. 26 Fragmentation by Design: Architecture, Finance, and Identity ROHAN KALYAN 1. Introduction In the fall of 2008, just as the global economy was beginning its hysterical descent into financial crisis, I traveled to New Delhi to conduct research on economic liberalization and urbanization in India. In particular, I was interested in a Delhi suburb called New Gurgaon in the state of Haryana, located just to the south of New Delhi and connected by a new elevated expressway to Indira Gandhi International Airport. New Gurgaon was of particular interest to me because of the rapid speed of its urban development in the post-liberalization era, which began roughly a quarter-century ago. At that time, Gurgaon comprised mainly agricultural land owned by small-tomedium-size farmers and villages. By 2008, it had mushroomed into a collection of speculative enclaves comprising commercial, industrial, and residential spaces that were geared toward attracting private investment. Gurgaon’s rapid rural-to-urban transition was often portrayed in popular media as heralding India’s larger national emergence from its postcolonial shell and its transformation into a confident, globalized economy. In the history of Gurgaon’s spatial transformation, the role of one real estate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grey Room MIT Press

Fragmentation by Design: Architecture, Finance, and Identity

Grey Room , Volume Summer 2011 (44) – Jul 1, 2011

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References (30)

Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2011 by Grey Room, Inc. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
ISSN
1526-3819
eISSN
1536-0105
DOI
10.1162/GREY_a_00041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Billboard landscapes in Gurgaon, India, 2008. Photo by Rohan Kalyan. 26 Fragmentation by Design: Architecture, Finance, and Identity ROHAN KALYAN 1. Introduction In the fall of 2008, just as the global economy was beginning its hysterical descent into financial crisis, I traveled to New Delhi to conduct research on economic liberalization and urbanization in India. In particular, I was interested in a Delhi suburb called New Gurgaon in the state of Haryana, located just to the south of New Delhi and connected by a new elevated expressway to Indira Gandhi International Airport. New Gurgaon was of particular interest to me because of the rapid speed of its urban development in the post-liberalization era, which began roughly a quarter-century ago. At that time, Gurgaon comprised mainly agricultural land owned by small-tomedium-size farmers and villages. By 2008, it had mushroomed into a collection of speculative enclaves comprising commercial, industrial, and residential spaces that were geared toward attracting private investment. Gurgaon’s rapid rural-to-urban transition was often portrayed in popular media as heralding India’s larger national emergence from its postcolonial shell and its transformation into a confident, globalized economy. In the history of Gurgaon’s spatial transformation, the role of one real estate

Journal

Grey RoomMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 2011

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