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Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome: What is the Cognitive Phenotype?

Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome: What is the Cognitive Phenotype? Two cognitive anomalies have been found in autism: a superiority on the Embedded Figures Task and a deficit in “theory of mind.” Using adult-level versions of these tasks, the present study investigated if parents of children with Asperger Syndrome might show a mild variant of these anomalies, as might be predicted from a genetic hypothesis. Significant differences were found on both measures. Parents were significantly faster than controls on the Embedded Figures Task and slightly but significantly less accurate at interpreting photographs of the eye region of the face in terms of mental states. The results are discussed in terms of the broader cognitive phenotype of Asperger Syndrome and in terms of their implications for cognitive neuroscientific theories of the condition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience MIT Press

Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome: What is the Cognitive Phenotype?

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References (55)

Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 1997 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0898-929X
eISSN
1530-8898
DOI
10.1162/jocn.1997.9.4.548
pmid
23968217
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two cognitive anomalies have been found in autism: a superiority on the Embedded Figures Task and a deficit in “theory of mind.” Using adult-level versions of these tasks, the present study investigated if parents of children with Asperger Syndrome might show a mild variant of these anomalies, as might be predicted from a genetic hypothesis. Significant differences were found on both measures. Parents were significantly faster than controls on the Embedded Figures Task and slightly but significantly less accurate at interpreting photographs of the eye region of the face in terms of mental states. The results are discussed in terms of the broader cognitive phenotype of Asperger Syndrome and in terms of their implications for cognitive neuroscientific theories of the condition.

Journal

Journal of Cognitive NeuroscienceMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 1997

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