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The Jim Crow Soft-Shoe Segregationists of St. George

The Jim Crow Soft-Shoe Segregationists of St. George The None and the Many WHITE BLIGHT The Jim Crow Soft-Shoe Segregationists of St. George T 3 Tom Gogola he Mall of Louisiana is a sprawling, indoor-outdoor retail complex whose commodity affiliations run the gamut from a tucked-away Spencer’s sin emporium to an ever-bustling Chick-fil-A in the food court. There’s a smattering of region-specific shops, including one called Storyville, which offers ersatz totems of the heyday of New Orleans jazz life. It shares the name of, but exactly nothing else about, the neighborhood where Louis Armstrong grew up. But this blandified memorial to a far livelier cultural past does have totemic significance of its own. Located in the suburban settlement of St. George, the Mall of Louisiana—and most particularly, the millions in tax revenue it generates—was, until recently, ground zero in a fiercely pitched battle over the economic, political, and racial makeup of Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s capital city. This May, the Baton Rouge city council voted to annex the mall firmly within the city’s borders—thus claiming for the majority-black city one of the key economic prizes that had been in the sights of a new cohort of affluent (and mostly white) would-be municipal secessionists. But that setback for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Baffler MIT Press

The Jim Crow Soft-Shoe Segregationists of St. George

The BafflerMar 1, 2014

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2014 Tom Gogola
ISSN
1059-9789
eISSN
2164-926X
DOI
10.1162/BFLR_a_00246
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The None and the Many WHITE BLIGHT The Jim Crow Soft-Shoe Segregationists of St. George T 3 Tom Gogola he Mall of Louisiana is a sprawling, indoor-outdoor retail complex whose commodity affiliations run the gamut from a tucked-away Spencer’s sin emporium to an ever-bustling Chick-fil-A in the food court. There’s a smattering of region-specific shops, including one called Storyville, which offers ersatz totems of the heyday of New Orleans jazz life. It shares the name of, but exactly nothing else about, the neighborhood where Louis Armstrong grew up. But this blandified memorial to a far livelier cultural past does have totemic significance of its own. Located in the suburban settlement of St. George, the Mall of Louisiana—and most particularly, the millions in tax revenue it generates—was, until recently, ground zero in a fiercely pitched battle over the economic, political, and racial makeup of Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s capital city. This May, the Baton Rouge city council voted to annex the mall firmly within the city’s borders—thus claiming for the majority-black city one of the key economic prizes that had been in the sights of a new cohort of affluent (and mostly white) would-be municipal secessionists. But that setback for

Journal

The BafflerMIT Press

Published: Mar 1, 2014

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