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Tip and Gip Sip and Quip: The politics of never

Tip and Gip Sip and Quip: The politics of never Po l i t i c s b y O t h e r M e m e s Tip and Gip Sip and Quip The politics of never O 3 Chris Br ay a better place. President Ronald Reagan and Speaker of the House Thomas “Tip” O’Neill were both Irish Americans, so they told jokes and stories to one another, so government happened, and it was all more or less wonderful. Really: The outsider and the insider: these two moved together in a remarkable, if sometimes rough, tandem. They argued mightily, each man belting out his separate, deeply cherished political philosophy—but then they would, both together, bow to the country’s judgment. Decisions were made, action taken, outcomes achieved. They honored the voters, respected the other’s role. Each guy liked to beat the other guy, not sabotage him. . . . Why, we wonder, can’t it be that way again? pen the book to the first page of the preface, and of course George Washington is sitting there on horseback, dreaming of his young nation and its glorious future. He’s there on the last page, too, looking down from a hillside at “this swamp along the Potomac,” boldly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Baffler MIT Press

Tip and Gip Sip and Quip: The politics of never

The BafflerMar 1, 2014

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2014 Chris Bray
ISSN
1059-9789
eISSN
2164-926X
DOI
10.1162/BFLR_a_00243
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Po l i t i c s b y O t h e r M e m e s Tip and Gip Sip and Quip The politics of never O 3 Chris Br ay a better place. President Ronald Reagan and Speaker of the House Thomas “Tip” O’Neill were both Irish Americans, so they told jokes and stories to one another, so government happened, and it was all more or less wonderful. Really: The outsider and the insider: these two moved together in a remarkable, if sometimes rough, tandem. They argued mightily, each man belting out his separate, deeply cherished political philosophy—but then they would, both together, bow to the country’s judgment. Decisions were made, action taken, outcomes achieved. They honored the voters, respected the other’s role. Each guy liked to beat the other guy, not sabotage him. . . . Why, we wonder, can’t it be that way again? pen the book to the first page of the preface, and of course George Washington is sitting there on horseback, dreaming of his young nation and its glorious future. He’s there on the last page, too, looking down from a hillside at “this swamp along the Potomac,” boldly

Journal

The BafflerMIT Press

Published: Mar 1, 2014

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