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Who's the Shop Steward on Your Kickstarter?

Who's the Shop Steward on Your Kickstarter? t h e R od of C or r e c t ion Who’s the Shop Steward on Your Kickstarter? 3 Josh MacPhee t least twice a week I get an email asking for support for a new project via Kickstarter. More often than not I pledge money, wanting to act in solidarity with friends and acquaintances with giant ideas but small bank accounts. And Kickstarter, once a promising platform for artists and other cultural producers to raise money, has become the go-to tool for fundraising by writers, artists, designers, political activists, and even popular musicians and award-winning filmmakers. As more friends use it, and as I cough up more and more money with every visit to the website, it seems a good time to try to crack it open to see how it works—and who it really works for. The basics are easy to understand. You have a project that requires financial help to realize. You choose an amount you want to raise, make a short video advertising the future project, and then post it on Kickstarter.com as a “campaign.” In order to entice people into supporting this campaign—or, in the site’s parlance, to become “backers”—you offer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Baffler MIT Press

Who's the Shop Steward on Your Kickstarter?

The BafflerNov 1, 2012

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2012 Josh MacPhee
Subject
The Rod of Correction
ISSN
1059-9789
eISSN
2164-926X
DOI
10.1162/BFLR_a_00108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

t h e R od of C or r e c t ion Who’s the Shop Steward on Your Kickstarter? 3 Josh MacPhee t least twice a week I get an email asking for support for a new project via Kickstarter. More often than not I pledge money, wanting to act in solidarity with friends and acquaintances with giant ideas but small bank accounts. And Kickstarter, once a promising platform for artists and other cultural producers to raise money, has become the go-to tool for fundraising by writers, artists, designers, political activists, and even popular musicians and award-winning filmmakers. As more friends use it, and as I cough up more and more money with every visit to the website, it seems a good time to try to crack it open to see how it works—and who it really works for. The basics are easy to understand. You have a project that requires financial help to realize. You choose an amount you want to raise, make a short video advertising the future project, and then post it on Kickstarter.com as a “campaign.” In order to entice people into supporting this campaign—or, in the site’s parlance, to become “backers”—you offer

Journal

The BafflerMIT Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.