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A neuromodulatory role for the human amygdala in processing emotional facial expressions.

A neuromodulatory role for the human amygdala in processing emotional facial expressions. Abstract Localized amygdalar lesions in humans produce deficits in the recognition of fearful facial expressions. We used functional neuroimaging to test two hypotheses: (i) that the amygdala and some of its functionally connected structures mediate specific neural responses to fearful expressions; (ii) that the early visual processing of emotional faces can be influenced by amygdalar activity. Normal subjects were scanned using PET while they performed a gender discrimination task involving static grey-scale images of faces expressing varying degrees of fear or happiness. In support of the first hypothesis, enhanced activity in the left amygdala, left pulvinar, left anterior insula and bilateral anterior cingulate gyri was observed during the processing of fearful faces. Evidence consistent with the second hypothesis was obtained by a demonstration that amygdalar responses predict expression-specific neural activity in extrastriate cortex. This content is only available as a PDF. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Oxford University Press

A neuromodulatory role for the human amygdala in processing emotional facial expressions.

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References (82)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
ISSN
0006-8950
eISSN
1460-2156
DOI
10.1093/brain/121.1.47
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Localized amygdalar lesions in humans produce deficits in the recognition of fearful facial expressions. We used functional neuroimaging to test two hypotheses: (i) that the amygdala and some of its functionally connected structures mediate specific neural responses to fearful expressions; (ii) that the early visual processing of emotional faces can be influenced by amygdalar activity. Normal subjects were scanned using PET while they performed a gender discrimination task involving static grey-scale images of faces expressing varying degrees of fear or happiness. In support of the first hypothesis, enhanced activity in the left amygdala, left pulvinar, left anterior insula and bilateral anterior cingulate gyri was observed during the processing of fearful faces. Evidence consistent with the second hypothesis was obtained by a demonstration that amygdalar responses predict expression-specific neural activity in extrastriate cortex. This content is only available as a PDF.

Journal

BrainOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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