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A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research

A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research The quantitative and qualitative research traditions can be thought of as distinct cultures marked by different values, beliefs, and norms. In this essay, we adopt this metaphor toward the end of contrasting these research traditions across 10 areas: (1) approaches to explanation, (2) conceptions of causation, (3) multivariate explanations, (4) equifinality, (5) scope and causal generalization, (6) case selection, (7) weighting observations, (8) substantively important cases, (9) lack of fit, and (10) concepts and measurement. We suggest that an appreciation of the alternative assumptions and goals of the traditions can help scholars avoid misunderstandings and contribute to more productive “cross-cultural” communication in political science. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Analysis Oxford University Press

A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Political Analysis , Volume 14 (3) – Jan 1, 2006

A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Political Analysis , Volume 14 (3) – Jan 1, 2006

Abstract

The quantitative and qualitative research traditions can be thought of as distinct cultures marked by different values, beliefs, and norms. In this essay, we adopt this metaphor toward the end of contrasting these research traditions across 10 areas: (1) approaches to explanation, (2) conceptions of causation, (3) multivariate explanations, (4) equifinality, (5) scope and causal generalization, (6) case selection, (7) weighting observations, (8) substantively important cases, (9) lack of fit, and (10) concepts and measurement. We suggest that an appreciation of the alternative assumptions and goals of the traditions can help scholars avoid misunderstandings and contribute to more productive “cross-cultural” communication in political science.

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References (111)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2006
ISSN
1047-1987
eISSN
1476-4989
DOI
10.1093/pan/mpj017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The quantitative and qualitative research traditions can be thought of as distinct cultures marked by different values, beliefs, and norms. In this essay, we adopt this metaphor toward the end of contrasting these research traditions across 10 areas: (1) approaches to explanation, (2) conceptions of causation, (3) multivariate explanations, (4) equifinality, (5) scope and causal generalization, (6) case selection, (7) weighting observations, (8) substantively important cases, (9) lack of fit, and (10) concepts and measurement. We suggest that an appreciation of the alternative assumptions and goals of the traditions can help scholars avoid misunderstandings and contribute to more productive “cross-cultural” communication in political science.

Journal

Political AnalysisOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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