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Administrative Behavior: A Study of Decision-Making Processes in Administrative Organization, by Herbert A. Simon

Administrative Behavior: A Study of Decision-Making Processes in Administrative Organization, by... N o . 4 ] REVIEWS (p. 13) or that Salmon P. Chase was a liberal (p. 345). There are a few careless errors, as the misspelling of Frederick Douglass in the index— it is spelled correctly at least twice in the text. The author’s enthusiasm sometimes gets the better of him, as when he describes Garrison’s T h o u g h t s o n C o l o n i z a t i o n as " the most significant tract produced in this country up to that time ” (p. 22). Yet such occasional weaknesses should not be allowed to obscure the fact that Mr. Madison’s book is essentially accurate, and th at it may well provide many educated Americans (who are not specialists in American history) with real insight into an important phase of American intellectual development. The writing is clear and force- ful. The chapters on Margaret Fuller, Thoreau and Henry George are remarkably fine, presenting these three unusual people as well- rounded, flesh-and-blood personalities. His John Brown, however, may seem a little overdone, and he cannot make Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman very attractive persons, even though he does arouse sympathy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Science Quarterly Oxford University Press

Administrative Behavior: A Study of Decision-Making Processes in Administrative Organization, by Herbert A. Simon

Political Science Quarterly , Volume 62 (4): 2 – Dec 15, 1947

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Copyright
1947 The Academy of Political Science
ISSN
0032-3195
eISSN
1538-165X
DOI
10.2307/2144907
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

N o . 4 ] REVIEWS (p. 13) or that Salmon P. Chase was a liberal (p. 345). There are a few careless errors, as the misspelling of Frederick Douglass in the index— it is spelled correctly at least twice in the text. The author’s enthusiasm sometimes gets the better of him, as when he describes Garrison’s T h o u g h t s o n C o l o n i z a t i o n as " the most significant tract produced in this country up to that time ” (p. 22). Yet such occasional weaknesses should not be allowed to obscure the fact that Mr. Madison’s book is essentially accurate, and th at it may well provide many educated Americans (who are not specialists in American history) with real insight into an important phase of American intellectual development. The writing is clear and force- ful. The chapters on Margaret Fuller, Thoreau and Henry George are remarkably fine, presenting these three unusual people as well- rounded, flesh-and-blood personalities. His John Brown, however, may seem a little overdone, and he cannot make Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman very attractive persons, even though he does arouse sympathy

Journal

Political Science QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Dec 15, 1947

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