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Decline of Male Labor Market Participation: The Role of Declining Market Opportunities

Decline of Male Labor Market Participation: The Role of Declining Market Opportunities Abstract This paper uses micro data from the Current Population Surveys to document the secular decline in labor market activity among prime age men from 1967 to 1987. Declines in employment occur at all ages but are found to be particularly severe among less-educated and low-wage men. Information on the cross-section wage-employment relationship and on actual wage changes indicates that the initial fall in employment from the late 1960s to the early 1970s is entirely attributable to falling labor supply whereas since the early 1970s, wage changes predict most of the decline in employment for whites and approximately half of the decline for blacks. * I would like to thank Robert J. LaLonde, Sherwin Rosen, and especially Kevin M. Murphy, without whose numerous suggestions and generous support this work could not have taken place. I would also like to thank Lawrence Katz and an anonymous referee for their helpful comments, and the Bradley Foundation for its financial support. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Quarterly Journal of Economics Oxford University Press

Decline of Male Labor Market Participation: The Role of Declining Market Opportunities

The Quarterly Journal of Economics , Volume 107 (1) – Feb 1, 1992

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References (18)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0033-5533
eISSN
1531-4650
DOI
10.2307/2118324
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This paper uses micro data from the Current Population Surveys to document the secular decline in labor market activity among prime age men from 1967 to 1987. Declines in employment occur at all ages but are found to be particularly severe among less-educated and low-wage men. Information on the cross-section wage-employment relationship and on actual wage changes indicates that the initial fall in employment from the late 1960s to the early 1970s is entirely attributable to falling labor supply whereas since the early 1970s, wage changes predict most of the decline in employment for whites and approximately half of the decline for blacks. * I would like to thank Robert J. LaLonde, Sherwin Rosen, and especially Kevin M. Murphy, without whose numerous suggestions and generous support this work could not have taken place. I would also like to thank Lawrence Katz and an anonymous referee for their helpful comments, and the Bradley Foundation for its financial support. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Journal

The Quarterly Journal of EconomicsOxford University Press

Published: Feb 1, 1992

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