Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

DRUG MARKETS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

DRUG MARKETS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT Abstract This paper examines the market in illegal drugs, law enforcement counter-measures, and their interaction in Britain. Doubt is cast on the conventional view that the drug market is monopolistic, dominated by a few big suppliers. A diverse set of enterprises, best distinguished by their qualitative features rather than their size, is described. These enterprises are faced by law enforcement agencies that have at their disposal formidable legislation which provides for life imprisonment and confiscation of assets of drug distributors. The British post-war history of legislation against distributors has been one of increasingly punitive measures, and although there is no evidence that this has restricted the distribution networks, it may have contributed to the increasing professionahzation of the trade. The authors conclude that drug control policies would be more effective if less enthusiasm were expended in raising levels of penalties and more attention paid to the ways in which an irrepressible market may be shaped in more or less harmful forms by legislation and policing strategies. This content is only available as a PDF. © The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Deliquency http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British Journal of Criminology Oxford University Press

DRUG MARKETS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/drug-markets-and-law-enforcement-eIR7ZW5Jm5

References (16)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Deliquency
ISSN
0007-0955
eISSN
1464-3529
DOI
10.1093/oxfordjournals.bjc.a047988
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This paper examines the market in illegal drugs, law enforcement counter-measures, and their interaction in Britain. Doubt is cast on the conventional view that the drug market is monopolistic, dominated by a few big suppliers. A diverse set of enterprises, best distinguished by their qualitative features rather than their size, is described. These enterprises are faced by law enforcement agencies that have at their disposal formidable legislation which provides for life imprisonment and confiscation of assets of drug distributors. The British post-war history of legislation against distributors has been one of increasingly punitive measures, and although there is no evidence that this has restricted the distribution networks, it may have contributed to the increasing professionahzation of the trade. The authors conclude that drug control policies would be more effective if less enthusiasm were expended in raising levels of penalties and more attention paid to the ways in which an irrepressible market may be shaped in more or less harmful forms by legislation and policing strategies. This content is only available as a PDF. © The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Deliquency

Journal

The British Journal of CriminologyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.