Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Effects of Caregiver Status, Coping Styles, and Social Support on the Physical Health of Korean American Caregivers

Effects of Caregiver Status, Coping Styles, and Social Support on the Physical Health of Korean... Purpose: This study investigated direct and indirect effects of caregiver status on the physical health of Korean American caregivers in terms of caregiver coping styles and the quantity and the quality of informal social support. Design and Methods: Using a sample of 87 caregivers and 87 matched noncaregivers, we analyzed a path model, employing both subjective (self-reported general health) and objective (blood pressure and cortisol levels) health indicators. For the intervening variables the path model employed coping styles and two aspects of social support (the quantity of informal social support and the quality of informal social support).  Results: Our findings supported the association of caregiver status with poor health outcomes among Korean American caregivers. Of interest, the adverse effects of caregiver status on the physical health of caregivers were reported only with objective health markers (blood pressure and cortisol levels), not with subjective health indicators. The proposed indirect effects of caregiver status were supported only for cortisol levels, through the quality of informal social support. Implications: The demonstration of the physical health effects of caregiving in one of the nation's fastest growing ethnic groups, and the finding that these physiological effects occur without self-reported poor health, call attention to a potentially serious health problem in an understudied group providing family care to frail older family members. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Gerontologist Oxford University Press

Effects of Caregiver Status, Coping Styles, and Social Support on the Physical Health of Korean American Caregivers

The Gerontologist , Volume 48 (3) – Jun 1, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/effects-of-caregiver-status-coping-styles-and-social-support-on-the-53mt8d1heL

References (47)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2008 by The Gerontological Society of America
Subject
CAREGIVING
ISSN
0016-9013
eISSN
1758-5341
DOI
10.1093/geront/48.3.287
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated direct and indirect effects of caregiver status on the physical health of Korean American caregivers in terms of caregiver coping styles and the quantity and the quality of informal social support. Design and Methods: Using a sample of 87 caregivers and 87 matched noncaregivers, we analyzed a path model, employing both subjective (self-reported general health) and objective (blood pressure and cortisol levels) health indicators. For the intervening variables the path model employed coping styles and two aspects of social support (the quantity of informal social support and the quality of informal social support).  Results: Our findings supported the association of caregiver status with poor health outcomes among Korean American caregivers. Of interest, the adverse effects of caregiver status on the physical health of caregivers were reported only with objective health markers (blood pressure and cortisol levels), not with subjective health indicators. The proposed indirect effects of caregiver status were supported only for cortisol levels, through the quality of informal social support. Implications: The demonstration of the physical health effects of caregiving in one of the nation's fastest growing ethnic groups, and the finding that these physiological effects occur without self-reported poor health, call attention to a potentially serious health problem in an understudied group providing family care to frail older family members.

Journal

The GerontologistOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2008

Keywords: Blood pressure Caregiving Cortisol Ethnicity Self-reported general health

There are no references for this article.