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Estimation of the Contribution of NonAssisted Reproductive Technology Ovulation Stimulation Fertility Treatments to US Singleton and Multiple Births

Estimation of the Contribution of NonAssisted Reproductive Technology Ovulation Stimulation... Infertility treatments that include ovulation stimulation, both assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and non-ART ovulation stimulation, are associated with increased risks of multiple birth and concomitant sequelae and adverse outcomes, even among singletons. While a US surveillance system for ART-induced births is ongoing, no population-based tracking system exists for births resulting from non-ART treatments. The authors developed a multistage model to estimate the uncertain proportion of US infants born in 2005 who were conceived by using non-ART ovulation treatments. Using published surveillance data, they estimated proportions of US multiple births conceived naturally and by ART and assumed that the remainder were conceived with non-ART treatments. They used Bayesian meta-analyses to summarize published clinical studies on the multiple-gestation risk associated with non-ART ovulation treatments, applied a fetal survival factor, and used this multiple-birth risk estimate and their own estimate of the proportion of US multiple births attributable to non-ART ovulation stimulation to estimate the total (and, through subtraction, singleton) proportion of infants conceived with such treatments. On the basis of the model, the authors estimate that 4.6% of US infants born in 2005 (95% uncertainty range: 2.8%7.1%) resulted from non-ART ovulation treatments. Notably, this figure is 4 times greater than the ART contribution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Estimation of the Contribution of NonAssisted Reproductive Technology Ovulation Stimulation Fertility Treatments to US Singleton and Multiple Births

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References (52)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
American Journal of Epidemiology Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2009.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
DOI
10.1093/aje/kwp281
pmid
19854803
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Infertility treatments that include ovulation stimulation, both assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and non-ART ovulation stimulation, are associated with increased risks of multiple birth and concomitant sequelae and adverse outcomes, even among singletons. While a US surveillance system for ART-induced births is ongoing, no population-based tracking system exists for births resulting from non-ART treatments. The authors developed a multistage model to estimate the uncertain proportion of US infants born in 2005 who were conceived by using non-ART ovulation treatments. Using published surveillance data, they estimated proportions of US multiple births conceived naturally and by ART and assumed that the remainder were conceived with non-ART treatments. They used Bayesian meta-analyses to summarize published clinical studies on the multiple-gestation risk associated with non-ART ovulation treatments, applied a fetal survival factor, and used this multiple-birth risk estimate and their own estimate of the proportion of US multiple births attributable to non-ART ovulation stimulation to estimate the total (and, through subtraction, singleton) proportion of infants conceived with such treatments. On the basis of the model, the authors estimate that 4.6% of US infants born in 2005 (95% uncertainty range: 2.8%7.1%) resulted from non-ART ovulation treatments. Notably, this figure is 4 times greater than the ART contribution.

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Oct 23, 2009

Keywords: birth rate infertility meta-analysis Monte Carlo method ovulation induction

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