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Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility

Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility Abstract This paper analyzes the extent to which ethnic skill differentials are transmitted across generations. I assume that ethnicity acts as an externality in the human capital accumulation process. The skills of the next generation depend on parental inputs and on the quality of the ethnic environment in which parents make their investments, or “ethnic capital.” The empirical evidence reveals that the skills of today's generation depend not only on the skills of their parents, but also on the average skills of the ethnic group in the parent's generation. * I have benefited from discussions with Julian Betts, John Conlisk, Richard Freeman, Daniel Hamermesh, Lawrence Katz, Alan Krueger, James Rauch, Glenn Sueyoshi, and Stephen Trejo. I am also grateful to the Russell Sage Foundation and to the National Science Foundation (Grant No. SES-8809281) for financial support. University of California, San Diego, and National Bureau of Economic Research This content is only available as a PDF. © 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Quarterly Journal of Economics Oxford University Press

Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility

The Quarterly Journal of Economics , Volume 107 (1) – Feb 1, 1992

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References (8)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0033-5533
eISSN
1531-4650
DOI
10.2307/2118325
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This paper analyzes the extent to which ethnic skill differentials are transmitted across generations. I assume that ethnicity acts as an externality in the human capital accumulation process. The skills of the next generation depend on parental inputs and on the quality of the ethnic environment in which parents make their investments, or “ethnic capital.” The empirical evidence reveals that the skills of today's generation depend not only on the skills of their parents, but also on the average skills of the ethnic group in the parent's generation. * I have benefited from discussions with Julian Betts, John Conlisk, Richard Freeman, Daniel Hamermesh, Lawrence Katz, Alan Krueger, James Rauch, Glenn Sueyoshi, and Stephen Trejo. I am also grateful to the Russell Sage Foundation and to the National Science Foundation (Grant No. SES-8809281) for financial support. University of California, San Diego, and National Bureau of Economic Research This content is only available as a PDF. © 1992 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Journal

The Quarterly Journal of EconomicsOxford University Press

Published: Feb 1, 1992

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