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Ethnic Mobilization in New and Old States: An Extension of the Competition Model

Ethnic Mobilization in New and Old States: An Extension of the Competition Model Abstract Ethnic mobilization simultaneously divides and unites the world's states. The common threat of internal division posed by subnational movements is a widely faced challenge shared by a diverse array of countries around the world. The rise of ethnic politics since the Second World War is best understood when ethnic mobilization is seen as a process of emergent group interests rather than simply the manifestation of primordial sentiments. This paper examines five essentially similar processes in both new and old states: urbanization, increased scales of organization, expansion of secondary and tertiary economic sectors, expansion of the political sector, and emergence of supranational organizations. Instead of reducing ethnic differences in favor of national-level identities, these development processes promote ethnic mobilization by increasing economic and political competition and organizing it on the basis of ethnicity. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Toronto, August, 1981. The authors thank Wendell Bell, Albert Hunter, and the five anonymous Social Problems reviewers for their comments on earlier drafts. No senior author. © 1982 Society for the Study of Social Problems, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Problems Oxford University Press

Ethnic Mobilization in New and Old States: An Extension of the Competition Model

Social Problems , Volume 30 (2) – Dec 1, 1982

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References (35)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1982 Society for the Study of Social Problems, Inc.
ISSN
0037-7791
eISSN
1533-8533
DOI
10.2307/800513
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Ethnic mobilization simultaneously divides and unites the world's states. The common threat of internal division posed by subnational movements is a widely faced challenge shared by a diverse array of countries around the world. The rise of ethnic politics since the Second World War is best understood when ethnic mobilization is seen as a process of emergent group interests rather than simply the manifestation of primordial sentiments. This paper examines five essentially similar processes in both new and old states: urbanization, increased scales of organization, expansion of secondary and tertiary economic sectors, expansion of the political sector, and emergence of supranational organizations. Instead of reducing ethnic differences in favor of national-level identities, these development processes promote ethnic mobilization by increasing economic and political competition and organizing it on the basis of ethnicity. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes * Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Toronto, August, 1981. The authors thank Wendell Bell, Albert Hunter, and the five anonymous Social Problems reviewers for their comments on earlier drafts. No senior author. © 1982 Society for the Study of Social Problems, Inc.

Journal

Social ProblemsOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1982

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