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In Defense of Politics, by Bernard Crick

In Defense of Politics, by Bernard Crick P O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E Q U A R T E R L Y [Vo l . LXXIX 1 3 8 indefensible assertion of moral superiority for one of the two overriding interests. But he does not consider whether, empiri­ cally, an overriding bipolar division of interests is not the gen­ eral case, and an overriding multiplicity of interests the special case found only where there is both a democratic franchise and an expanding and prosperous economy, in other words, only in some advanced Western nations at some times within only the last hundred years. Had Professor Miller entertained this hy­ pothesis he might also have questioned the adequacy of his six­ fold classification of political systems in Chap. XII (established parliamentary, experimental parliamentary, militarist and ran­ dom despotic, quasi-clerical, colonial, and communist) and have avoided the difficulty of having to fit Weimar Germany into the first category, which is the most highly pluralist. But to have entertained such a hypothesis would have been to weaken his pluralist description of politics, and thus to have deprived us of an excellent demonstration of the clarifying power and the limits http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Science Quarterly Oxford University Press

In Defense of Politics, by Bernard Crick

Political Science Quarterly , Volume 79 (1): 3 – Mar 15, 1964

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Copyright
1964 The Academy of Political Science
ISSN
0032-3195
eISSN
1538-165X
DOI
10.2307/2146589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E Q U A R T E R L Y [Vo l . LXXIX 1 3 8 indefensible assertion of moral superiority for one of the two overriding interests. But he does not consider whether, empiri­ cally, an overriding bipolar division of interests is not the gen­ eral case, and an overriding multiplicity of interests the special case found only where there is both a democratic franchise and an expanding and prosperous economy, in other words, only in some advanced Western nations at some times within only the last hundred years. Had Professor Miller entertained this hy­ pothesis he might also have questioned the adequacy of his six­ fold classification of political systems in Chap. XII (established parliamentary, experimental parliamentary, militarist and ran­ dom despotic, quasi-clerical, colonial, and communist) and have avoided the difficulty of having to fit Weimar Germany into the first category, which is the most highly pluralist. But to have entertained such a hypothesis would have been to weaken his pluralist description of politics, and thus to have deprived us of an excellent demonstration of the clarifying power and the limits

Journal

Political Science QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 15, 1964

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