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Is Spousal Caregiving Associated With Enhanced Well-Being? New Evidence From the Panel Study of Income Dynamics

Is Spousal Caregiving Associated With Enhanced Well-Being? New Evidence From the Panel Study of... Objectives.We explore whether spousal caregiving is associated with enhanced well-being for older husbands and wives.Method.We use time diary data from the 2009 Panel Study of Income Dynamics and Disability and Use of Time supplement. We measure experienced well-being as ratings of happiness and frustration during activities recalled for the previous day. We estimate separately for husbands and wives 3 distinct effects on experienced well-being: having a spouse with a disability; doing household or personal care tasks (“chores”) for someone other than a spouse with a disability; and doing such tasks for a spouse with a disability (“care”).Results.For husbands, neither care status nor spouse’s disability status are associated with experienced well-being. In contrast, for wives, carrying out chores is associated with lower reports of happiness compared with other activities and providing care to one’s husband is associated with greater reports of happiness than carrying out chores.Discussion.For women, chores such as meal preparation, laundry, and cleaning—but not caregiving per se—are associated with worse experienced well-being than other activities. Findings underscore that there are positive aspects of spousal caregiving for older wives that offset the innately unpleasant nature of household tasks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences Oxford University Press

Is Spousal Caregiving Associated With Enhanced Well-Being? New Evidence From the Panel Study of Income Dynamics

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References (76)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1079-5014
eISSN
1758-5368
DOI
10.1093/geronb/gbu004
pmid
24501250
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives.We explore whether spousal caregiving is associated with enhanced well-being for older husbands and wives.Method.We use time diary data from the 2009 Panel Study of Income Dynamics and Disability and Use of Time supplement. We measure experienced well-being as ratings of happiness and frustration during activities recalled for the previous day. We estimate separately for husbands and wives 3 distinct effects on experienced well-being: having a spouse with a disability; doing household or personal care tasks (“chores”) for someone other than a spouse with a disability; and doing such tasks for a spouse with a disability (“care”).Results.For husbands, neither care status nor spouse’s disability status are associated with experienced well-being. In contrast, for wives, carrying out chores is associated with lower reports of happiness compared with other activities and providing care to one’s husband is associated with greater reports of happiness than carrying out chores.Discussion.For women, chores such as meal preparation, laundry, and cleaning—but not caregiving per se—are associated with worse experienced well-being than other activities. Findings underscore that there are positive aspects of spousal caregiving for older wives that offset the innately unpleasant nature of household tasks.

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social SciencesOxford University Press

Published: Nov 5, 2014

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