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Model Building in Mathematical Programming

Model Building in Mathematical Programming 1979] Reviews 13. Computer Models in the Social Sciences, By R. B. Coats and A. Parkin. London, Edward Arnold, 24'5 em. vi, 184 p. 24'5 em. £3·75. How fortunate are the students at Leicester Polytechnic if Coats and Parkin are as engaging in lectures as they come over in print. Warmth in a textbook is not achieved by a few facetious asides but, as here, by an unpompous approach to one's subject and a willingness to admit one's own fallibility. The title is rather misleading as the book is an introduction to social science model building in general, and although the use of computers is built right into the text the real lessons are, so to speak, off-line. Because Chapter 1, in particular, is an excellent discussion of the place of models in social science methodology. As a non-philosopher I always have the feeling that any philosophical discussion I can understand cannot be right ("Any club that will have me as member ... "). So while a more learned reviewer might be able to tear this book up, I found it down to earth and without pretence. I am sure that most students would find it extremely helpful. and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A (Statistics in Society) Oxford University Press

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Copyright
© 1979 The Authors
ISSN
0964-1998
eISSN
1467-985X
DOI
10.2307/2344667
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1979] Reviews 13. Computer Models in the Social Sciences, By R. B. Coats and A. Parkin. London, Edward Arnold, 24'5 em. vi, 184 p. 24'5 em. £3·75. How fortunate are the students at Leicester Polytechnic if Coats and Parkin are as engaging in lectures as they come over in print. Warmth in a textbook is not achieved by a few facetious asides but, as here, by an unpompous approach to one's subject and a willingness to admit one's own fallibility. The title is rather misleading as the book is an introduction to social science model building in general, and although the use of computers is built right into the text the real lessons are, so to speak, off-line. Because Chapter 1, in particular, is an excellent discussion of the place of models in social science methodology. As a non-philosopher I always have the feeling that any philosophical discussion I can understand cannot be right ("Any club that will have me as member ... "). So while a more learned reviewer might be able to tear this book up, I found it down to earth and without pretence. I am sure that most students would find it extremely helpful. and

Journal

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A (Statistics in Society)Oxford University Press

Published: Dec 5, 2018

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