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Representation in State Legislatures, by Malcolm E. Jewell

Representation in State Legislatures, by Malcolm E. Jewell 536 I POLITICAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY public opinion about abortion, but that the impact of the abortion issue on electoral poli­ tics has been grossly exaggerated. All in all, these writers conclude that conflict over abortion will probably not destroy the republic. A fifth selection, added as sort of an end-piece to the book, describes the destructive results that followed attempts to enforce the prohibition of liquor, but fails to develop parallels between the moral crusade agains liquor t and that against abortion. I found two insights in these writings intriguing. The first, raised by Friedman, is the notion that the Supreme Court probably saw Roe v. Wade as a family planning decision, rather than as a judicial legitimatization of the sexual revolution, and thought that family ties would be strengthened if women could decide not to bear unwanted children. Sec­ ondly, Jackson and Vinovskis note that there is a statistically significant relationship in public opinion data “between religiosity and abortion attitude”s (p. 71). Family and religious attitudes are the underlying issues in the abortion dispute. The symposium does not address either of these directly, although Friedman points out that one of the Supreme Court ’s roles is the uprooting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Science Quarterly Oxford University Press

Representation in State Legislatures, by Malcolm E. Jewell

Political Science Quarterly , Volume 98 (3): 2 – Sep 15, 1983

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References (107)

Copyright
1983 The Academy of Political Science
ISSN
0032-3195
eISSN
1538-165X
DOI
10.2307/2150520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

536 I POLITICAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY public opinion about abortion, but that the impact of the abortion issue on electoral poli­ tics has been grossly exaggerated. All in all, these writers conclude that conflict over abortion will probably not destroy the republic. A fifth selection, added as sort of an end-piece to the book, describes the destructive results that followed attempts to enforce the prohibition of liquor, but fails to develop parallels between the moral crusade agains liquor t and that against abortion. I found two insights in these writings intriguing. The first, raised by Friedman, is the notion that the Supreme Court probably saw Roe v. Wade as a family planning decision, rather than as a judicial legitimatization of the sexual revolution, and thought that family ties would be strengthened if women could decide not to bear unwanted children. Sec­ ondly, Jackson and Vinovskis note that there is a statistically significant relationship in public opinion data “between religiosity and abortion attitude”s (p. 71). Family and religious attitudes are the underlying issues in the abortion dispute. The symposium does not address either of these directly, although Friedman points out that one of the Supreme Court ’s roles is the uprooting

Journal

Political Science QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Sep 15, 1983

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