Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Self, Society, and the “New Gerontology”

Self, Society, and the “New Gerontology” The “new gerontology,” built on the concept of successful aging, sets forth the preconditions for and the end product of the process of aging successfully. Focused on health and active participation in life, it vests largely within individuals the power to achieve this normatively desirable state. While acknowledging the contributions of the scientific base for Rowe and Kahn's successful aging model, we emphasize the need for a more careful examination of the model itself. Using critical gerontology as a primary filter, we critique this normative vision by focusing on its unarticulated (and perhaps unexplored) values, assumptions, and consequences. We argue that these unexamined features may further harm older people, particularly older women, the poor, and people of color who are already marginalized. We conclude by suggesting forms of resistance to this univocal standard. Key words http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Gerontologist Oxford University Press

Self, Society, and the “New Gerontology”

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/self-society-and-the-new-gerontology-E6wrt9seOt

References (84)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 The Gerontological Society of America
ISSN
0016-9013
eISSN
1758-5341
DOI
10.1093/geront/43.6.787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The “new gerontology,” built on the concept of successful aging, sets forth the preconditions for and the end product of the process of aging successfully. Focused on health and active participation in life, it vests largely within individuals the power to achieve this normatively desirable state. While acknowledging the contributions of the scientific base for Rowe and Kahn's successful aging model, we emphasize the need for a more careful examination of the model itself. Using critical gerontology as a primary filter, we critique this normative vision by focusing on its unarticulated (and perhaps unexplored) values, assumptions, and consequences. We argue that these unexamined features may further harm older people, particularly older women, the poor, and people of color who are already marginalized. We conclude by suggesting forms of resistance to this univocal standard. Key words

Journal

The GerontologistOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.