Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Administration of Gender Identity in Nazi Germany

The Administration of Gender Identity in Nazi Germany The Administration of Gender Identity in Nazi Germany by Jane Caplan The history of women and gender has undergone profound transformations and elaborations since Tim Mason began his work on ‘Women in Germany’ for the Ruskin History Workshop in 1973. At that time women’s history barely existed as an academic field, and what most of us knew about women in Nazi Germany was still largely drawn from Clifford Kirkpatrick’s 1939 book on women and family life. In German women’s history, the two British pioneers were Jill Stephenson and Richard Evans, both of whom were completing dissertations on the subject that were published shortly before Tim’s two-part essay appeared in History Workshop Journal in 1976. He began with one of his overriding concerns, the mobilization of resources for war, and with a characteristic question: why did something not happen that might have been expected to happen? In this case, why were women not mobilized to meet the wartime demand for labour? Typically, his answer led him into a wide-ranging and thoughtful account that took in the social history of women and the family, as well as the economics and politics of women’s waged labour between the 1920s and the 1940s. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History Workshop Journal Oxford University Press

The Administration of Gender Identity in Nazi Germany

History Workshop Journal , Volume 72 (1) – Oct 23, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/the-administration-of-gender-identity-in-nazi-germany-IvqEyA1x0b

References (35)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of History Workshop Journal, all rights reserved.
ISSN
1363-3554
eISSN
1477-4569
DOI
10.1093/hwj/dbr021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Administration of Gender Identity in Nazi Germany by Jane Caplan The history of women and gender has undergone profound transformations and elaborations since Tim Mason began his work on ‘Women in Germany’ for the Ruskin History Workshop in 1973. At that time women’s history barely existed as an academic field, and what most of us knew about women in Nazi Germany was still largely drawn from Clifford Kirkpatrick’s 1939 book on women and family life. In German women’s history, the two British pioneers were Jill Stephenson and Richard Evans, both of whom were completing dissertations on the subject that were published shortly before Tim’s two-part essay appeared in History Workshop Journal in 1976. He began with one of his overriding concerns, the mobilization of resources for war, and with a characteristic question: why did something not happen that might have been expected to happen? In this case, why were women not mobilized to meet the wartime demand for labour? Typically, his answer led him into a wide-ranging and thoughtful account that took in the social history of women and the family, as well as the economics and politics of women’s waged labour between the 1920s and the 1940s.

Journal

History Workshop JournalOxford University Press

Published: Oct 23, 2011

There are no references for this article.