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The Busy Ethic: Moral Continuity Between Work and Retirement

The Busy Ethic: Moral Continuity Between Work and Retirement Abstract This paper suggests that retirement is legitimated on a day-to-day basis in part by an ethic that esteems leisure that is earnest, active, and occupied. This busy ethic, named for the emphasis people place on keeping busy in retirement, endorses conduct that is consistent with the abstract ideals of the work ethic. The busy ethic justifies the leisure of retirement, defends retired people against judgments of senescence, and gives definition to the retirement role. In all, it helps individuals adapt to retirement, and it in turn adapts retirement to prevailing societal values. Leisure, Norms, Socialization, Transitions, Values This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes 1 Supported in part by the Medical Research Service of the Veterans Administration and by grants from the Administration on Aging (90-A-1194) and the National Institute on Aging (AG02287). The author thanks Raymond Bosse, Thomas Cole, and Linda Evans for helpful comments. © 1986 The Gerontological Society of America http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Gerontologist Oxford University Press

The Busy Ethic: Moral Continuity Between Work and Retirement

The Gerontologist , Volume 26 (3) – Jun 1, 1986

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1986 The Gerontological Society of America
ISSN
0016-9013
eISSN
1758-5341
DOI
10.1093/geront/26.3.239
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This paper suggests that retirement is legitimated on a day-to-day basis in part by an ethic that esteems leisure that is earnest, active, and occupied. This busy ethic, named for the emphasis people place on keeping busy in retirement, endorses conduct that is consistent with the abstract ideals of the work ethic. The busy ethic justifies the leisure of retirement, defends retired people against judgments of senescence, and gives definition to the retirement role. In all, it helps individuals adapt to retirement, and it in turn adapts retirement to prevailing societal values. Leisure, Norms, Socialization, Transitions, Values This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes 1 Supported in part by the Medical Research Service of the Veterans Administration and by grants from the Administration on Aging (90-A-1194) and the National Institute on Aging (AG02287). The author thanks Raymond Bosse, Thomas Cole, and Linda Evans for helpful comments. © 1986 The Gerontological Society of America

Journal

The GerontologistOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 1986

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