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Types of Conflicts and Tensions Between Older Parents and Adult Children

Types of Conflicts and Tensions Between Older Parents and Adult Children What are the most common themes of conflict between aging parents and their adult children? Six types emerged in a qualitative analysis of Longitudinal Study of Generations survey data: conflicts over (1) communication and interaction style; (2) habits and lifestyle choices; (3) child-rearing practices and values; (4) politics, religion, and ideology; (5) work habits and orientations; and (6) household standards or maintenance. There were generational differences: parents most often listed conflicts over habits and lifestyle choices, whereas children cited communication and interaction style. These results suggest a new agenda for gerontological research: intergenerational conflict in the context of solidarity within aging families. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Gerontologist Oxford University Press

Types of Conflicts and Tensions Between Older Parents and Adult Children

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References (24)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0016-9013
eISSN
1758-5341
DOI
10.1093/geront/39.3.261
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What are the most common themes of conflict between aging parents and their adult children? Six types emerged in a qualitative analysis of Longitudinal Study of Generations survey data: conflicts over (1) communication and interaction style; (2) habits and lifestyle choices; (3) child-rearing practices and values; (4) politics, religion, and ideology; (5) work habits and orientations; and (6) household standards or maintenance. There were generational differences: parents most often listed conflicts over habits and lifestyle choices, whereas children cited communication and interaction style. These results suggest a new agenda for gerontological research: intergenerational conflict in the context of solidarity within aging families.

Journal

The GerontologistOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 1999

Keywords: Intergenerational relationships Parent-child conflict Aging parents Middle-aged issues

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