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Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age

Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age Book Reviews 587 the author of this study, Bradford J. Wood, understanding of a region. He is at his best makes extensive use of all of the conventional when he describes what makes the lower Cape sources. He moves a step beyond them, how- Fear different not just from other regions of the ever, by gathering quantifiable data from local Carolina colony but from other parts of North records (court minutes, land records, church America. Ironically, those differences evaporat- records, etc.) to fill in the considerable gaps in ed with the end of the century. As he argues so the extant records and thereby to subject this well, the lower Cape Fear was an eighteenth- region to a different kind of analysis. century construct that declined in importance North Carolina in the eighteenth century as the century came to a close. grew rapidly, but the lower Cape Fear region, Donna J. Spindel a latecomer to settlement, established itself as Marshall University the most prosperous region of the colony by Huntington, West Virginia the time of the Revolution. How this region was settled, how it developed, how it came Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the to be unique http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of American History Oxford University Press

Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age

The Journal of American History , Volume 92 (2) – Sep 1, 2005

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0021-8723
eISSN
1945-2314
DOI
10.2307/3659291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 587 the author of this study, Bradford J. Wood, understanding of a region. He is at his best makes extensive use of all of the conventional when he describes what makes the lower Cape sources. He moves a step beyond them, how- Fear different not just from other regions of the ever, by gathering quantifiable data from local Carolina colony but from other parts of North records (court minutes, land records, church America. Ironically, those differences evaporat- records, etc.) to fill in the considerable gaps in ed with the end of the century. As he argues so the extant records and thereby to subject this well, the lower Cape Fear was an eighteenth- region to a different kind of analysis. century construct that declined in importance North Carolina in the eighteenth century as the century came to a close. grew rapidly, but the lower Cape Fear region, Donna J. Spindel a latecomer to settlement, established itself as Marshall University the most prosperous region of the colony by Huntington, West Virginia the time of the Revolution. How this region was settled, how it developed, how it came Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the to be unique

Journal

The Journal of American HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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