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A long term study of the health status and performance of sows on different feed allowances during late pregnancy. I. Clinical observations, with special reference to agalactia post partum.

A long term study of the health status and performance of sows on different feed allowances... Thirty nine pairs of full sibs were investigated over 6 parities in a long term study on the effects of late pregnancy feed allowance on the occurrence of agalactia post partum and on the performance of sows and piglets. A careful examination of all sows with a rectal temperature exceeding 39.5 degrees C was performed by a veterinarian within the first 48 h after farrowing. Milk-samples were taken from sows with elevated rectal temperatures and showing clinical symptoms of agalactia. During the last 15 days of gestation the sows in the control group were fed 3.4 kg daily and the sows in the experimental group 1.0 kg daily of a commercial type of diet. In 26.6% of the farrowings in the control group the sows were agalactic whereas the corresponding figure in the experimental group was 14.4%. On clinical examination udder changes were observed in a majority of the diseased sows in both groups. However, the agalactic sows in the control group were generally more affected, with lower water and feed consumption than in the experimental group. No effects of age of the sow (parity number) or length of the gestation period on the incidence of agalactia were demonstrated. The rectal temperature of agalactic sows was significantly higher than in the healthy sows already 1 day before farrowing. The agalactic sows farrowed a larger number of stillborn piglets, which indicates an early establishment of the disease. The number of weaned piglets at 6 weeks did not differ between agalactic and healthy animals. The interval from weaning to first oestrus was not influenced by agalactia in the preceding lactation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta veterinaria Scandinavica Pubmed

A long term study of the health status and performance of sows on different feed allowances during late pregnancy. I. Clinical observations, with special reference to agalactia post partum.

Acta veterinaria Scandinavica , Volume 30 (1): 9 – Oct 26, 1989

A long term study of the health status and performance of sows on different feed allowances during late pregnancy. I. Clinical observations, with special reference to agalactia post partum.


Abstract

Thirty nine pairs of full sibs were investigated over 6 parities in a long term study on the effects of late pregnancy feed allowance on the occurrence of agalactia post partum and on the performance of sows and piglets. A careful examination of all sows with a rectal temperature exceeding 39.5 degrees C was performed by a veterinarian within the first 48 h after farrowing. Milk-samples were taken from sows with elevated rectal temperatures and showing clinical symptoms of agalactia. During the last 15 days of gestation the sows in the control group were fed 3.4 kg daily and the sows in the experimental group 1.0 kg daily of a commercial type of diet. In 26.6% of the farrowings in the control group the sows were agalactic whereas the corresponding figure in the experimental group was 14.4%. On clinical examination udder changes were observed in a majority of the diseased sows in both groups. However, the agalactic sows in the control group were generally more affected, with lower water and feed consumption than in the experimental group. No effects of age of the sow (parity number) or length of the gestation period on the incidence of agalactia were demonstrated. The rectal temperature of agalactic sows was significantly higher than in the healthy sows already 1 day before farrowing. The agalactic sows farrowed a larger number of stillborn piglets, which indicates an early establishment of the disease. The number of weaned piglets at 6 weeks did not differ between agalactic and healthy animals. The interval from weaning to first oestrus was not influenced by agalactia in the preceding lactation.

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ISSN
0044-605X
pmid
2782237

Abstract

Thirty nine pairs of full sibs were investigated over 6 parities in a long term study on the effects of late pregnancy feed allowance on the occurrence of agalactia post partum and on the performance of sows and piglets. A careful examination of all sows with a rectal temperature exceeding 39.5 degrees C was performed by a veterinarian within the first 48 h after farrowing. Milk-samples were taken from sows with elevated rectal temperatures and showing clinical symptoms of agalactia. During the last 15 days of gestation the sows in the control group were fed 3.4 kg daily and the sows in the experimental group 1.0 kg daily of a commercial type of diet. In 26.6% of the farrowings in the control group the sows were agalactic whereas the corresponding figure in the experimental group was 14.4%. On clinical examination udder changes were observed in a majority of the diseased sows in both groups. However, the agalactic sows in the control group were generally more affected, with lower water and feed consumption than in the experimental group. No effects of age of the sow (parity number) or length of the gestation period on the incidence of agalactia were demonstrated. The rectal temperature of agalactic sows was significantly higher than in the healthy sows already 1 day before farrowing. The agalactic sows farrowed a larger number of stillborn piglets, which indicates an early establishment of the disease. The number of weaned piglets at 6 weeks did not differ between agalactic and healthy animals. The interval from weaning to first oestrus was not influenced by agalactia in the preceding lactation.

Journal

Acta veterinaria ScandinavicaPubmed

Published: Oct 26, 1989

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