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A Randomized Study Using Telepresence Robots for Behavioral Health in Interprofessional Practice and Education.

A Randomized Study Using Telepresence Robots for Behavioral Health in Interprofessional Practice... Background: The events of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced the world to adopt telemedicine frameworks to comply with isolation and stay-at-home regulations. Telemedicine, in various forms, has been used by patients and medical professionals for quite some time, especially telepsychiatry. To examine the efficacy and role of telesimulation as a method to educate health sciences students via telepresence robots. The study recruited students from the above health science disciplines. All participants were trained to administer a contextual interview to a standardized patient (SP) for mental health concerns. Methods: The completion of the contextual interview observation form adult (CIOF-A), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index, self-efficacy in patient centeredness questionnaire (SEPCQ), and communication skills attitude scale with or without a telepresence robot. All participants completed baseline metrics and were trained to conduct a contextual interview to an SP. Researchers block-randomized the participants to either the telepresence robot group (TP) or in-person (IP) group. Results: The study recruited n = 43 participants to the IP group (n = 21) or TP group (n = 22). Mean participant demographics of age were 25.3 (±1.9) years in the IP group and 24.3 (±2.1) years for the TP group. Mean and standard deviation scores with effect sizes in CIOF-A scores IP: 0.05 (±1.91) and TP: -0.45 (±1.71), Cohen's d = 0.28; SEPCQ-Patient Domain scores IP: 0.42 (±4.69) and TP: 0.50 (±7.18), Cohen's d = 0.01; change in SEPCQ-Sharing Domain scores IP: 0.53 (±5.10) and TP: 0.91 (±9.98), Cohen's d = 0.05. These effect sizes will inform future studies and appropriate sample sizes. Conclusion: These data indicate that health sciences students utilizing a telepresence robot in an SP scenario to perform a behavioral health screening felt as comfortable and competent as those health sciences students performing the same behavioral health screening in person. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03661372. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association Pubmed

A Randomized Study Using Telepresence Robots for Behavioral Health in Interprofessional Practice and Education.

Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association , Volume 27 (7): 8 – Jul 16, 2021

A Randomized Study Using Telepresence Robots for Behavioral Health in Interprofessional Practice and Education.


Abstract

Background: The events of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced the world to adopt telemedicine frameworks to comply with isolation and stay-at-home regulations. Telemedicine, in various forms, has been used by patients and medical professionals for quite some time, especially telepsychiatry. To examine the efficacy and role of telesimulation as a method to educate health sciences students via telepresence robots. The study recruited students from the above health science disciplines. All participants were trained to administer a contextual interview to a standardized patient (SP) for mental health concerns. Methods: The completion of the contextual interview observation form adult (CIOF-A), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index, self-efficacy in patient centeredness questionnaire (SEPCQ), and communication skills attitude scale with or without a telepresence robot. All participants completed baseline metrics and were trained to conduct a contextual interview to an SP. Researchers block-randomized the participants to either the telepresence robot group (TP) or in-person (IP) group. Results: The study recruited n = 43 participants to the IP group (n = 21) or TP group (n = 22). Mean participant demographics of age were 25.3 (±1.9) years in the IP group and 24.3 (±2.1) years for the TP group. Mean and standard deviation scores with effect sizes in CIOF-A scores IP: 0.05 (±1.91) and TP: -0.45 (±1.71), Cohen's d = 0.28; SEPCQ-Patient Domain scores IP: 0.42 (±4.69) and TP: 0.50 (±7.18), Cohen's d = 0.01; change in SEPCQ-Sharing Domain scores IP: 0.53 (±5.10) and TP: 0.91 (±9.98), Cohen's d = 0.05. These effect sizes will inform future studies and appropriate sample sizes. Conclusion: These data indicate that health sciences students utilizing a telepresence robot in an SP scenario to perform a behavioral health screening felt as comfortable and competent as those health sciences students performing the same behavioral health screening in person. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03661372.

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eISSN
1556-3669
DOI
10.1089/tmj.2020.0245
pmid
33090088

Abstract

Background: The events of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced the world to adopt telemedicine frameworks to comply with isolation and stay-at-home regulations. Telemedicine, in various forms, has been used by patients and medical professionals for quite some time, especially telepsychiatry. To examine the efficacy and role of telesimulation as a method to educate health sciences students via telepresence robots. The study recruited students from the above health science disciplines. All participants were trained to administer a contextual interview to a standardized patient (SP) for mental health concerns. Methods: The completion of the contextual interview observation form adult (CIOF-A), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index, self-efficacy in patient centeredness questionnaire (SEPCQ), and communication skills attitude scale with or without a telepresence robot. All participants completed baseline metrics and were trained to conduct a contextual interview to an SP. Researchers block-randomized the participants to either the telepresence robot group (TP) or in-person (IP) group. Results: The study recruited n = 43 participants to the IP group (n = 21) or TP group (n = 22). Mean participant demographics of age were 25.3 (±1.9) years in the IP group and 24.3 (±2.1) years for the TP group. Mean and standard deviation scores with effect sizes in CIOF-A scores IP: 0.05 (±1.91) and TP: -0.45 (±1.71), Cohen's d = 0.28; SEPCQ-Patient Domain scores IP: 0.42 (±4.69) and TP: 0.50 (±7.18), Cohen's d = 0.01; change in SEPCQ-Sharing Domain scores IP: 0.53 (±5.10) and TP: 0.91 (±9.98), Cohen's d = 0.05. These effect sizes will inform future studies and appropriate sample sizes. Conclusion: These data indicate that health sciences students utilizing a telepresence robot in an SP scenario to perform a behavioral health screening felt as comfortable and competent as those health sciences students performing the same behavioral health screening in person. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03661372.

Journal

Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine AssociationPubmed

Published: Jul 16, 2021

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