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[Education, birth cohort, and marriage age: a comparative analysis of marriage age in West Germany, East Germany, and the United States].

[Education, birth cohort, and marriage age: a comparative analysis of marriage age in West... "This paper investigates how education influences marriage behavior in three countries: the United States, West Germany, and former East Germany. Following family economics we postulate that for women a longer education decreases marriage rates both during education (institutional effect) and after the degree has been obtained (human capital effect). For men family economics predicts the delaying institutional effect, too, but the human capital effect is expected to increase marriage rates. Further considerations lead to the additional hypothesis that for younger birth cohorts these sex differences should attenuate.... For the United States and West Germany the observed marriage patterns confirm our hypotheses for the most part. For East Germany, however, we observe different marriage patterns. This was expected because the institutional context in this former socialist country was a very different one." (SUMMARY IN ENG) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zeitschrift fur Soziologie Pubmed

[Education, birth cohort, and marriage age: a comparative analysis of marriage age in West Germany, East Germany, and the United States].

Zeitschrift fur Soziologie , Volume 23 (1): 1701 – Aug 5, 1996

[Education, birth cohort, and marriage age: a comparative analysis of marriage age in West Germany, East Germany, and the United States].


Abstract

"This paper investigates how education influences marriage behavior in three countries: the United States, West Germany, and former East Germany. Following family economics we postulate that for women a longer education decreases marriage rates both during education (institutional effect) and after the degree has been obtained (human capital effect). For men family economics predicts the delaying institutional effect, too, but the human capital effect is expected to increase marriage rates. Further considerations lead to the additional hypothesis that for younger birth cohorts these sex differences should attenuate.... For the United States and West Germany the observed marriage patterns confirm our hypotheses for the most part. For East Germany, however, we observe different marriage patterns. This was expected because the institutional context in this former socialist country was a very different one." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

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ISSN
0340-1804
pmid
12347161

Abstract

"This paper investigates how education influences marriage behavior in three countries: the United States, West Germany, and former East Germany. Following family economics we postulate that for women a longer education decreases marriage rates both during education (institutional effect) and after the degree has been obtained (human capital effect). For men family economics predicts the delaying institutional effect, too, but the human capital effect is expected to increase marriage rates. Further considerations lead to the additional hypothesis that for younger birth cohorts these sex differences should attenuate.... For the United States and West Germany the observed marriage patterns confirm our hypotheses for the most part. For East Germany, however, we observe different marriage patterns. This was expected because the institutional context in this former socialist country was a very different one." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

Journal

Zeitschrift fur SoziologiePubmed

Published: Aug 5, 1996

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