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Frequency and clinical description of high-cost patients in 17 acute-care hospitals.

Frequency and clinical description of high-cost patients in 17 acute-care hospitals. To assess the potential impact of national "catastrophic" health insurance on the medical-care system, the frequency and clinical characteristics of high-cost patients were surveyed at 17 acute-care hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area. The percentage of patients whose yearly hospital charges exceeded $4000 in 1976 ranged from 4 at a community hospital to 24 at a referral hospital. Hospital costs charged to these patients ranged from 20 to 68 per cent of total billings, with the highest percentages generally occurring at large referral hospitals. Forty-seven per cent of adult high-cost patients had chronic medical conditions, and only one in six suffered from an acute medical "catastrophe." In addition, more than 13 per cent of high-cost patients died in the hospital. National catastrophic health insurance is likely to pay for much chronic illness and terminal care and divert resources toward acute-care hospitals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England journal of medicine Pubmed

Frequency and clinical description of high-cost patients in 17 acute-care hospitals.

The New England journal of medicine , Volume 300 (23): -1296 – Jul 16, 1979

Frequency and clinical description of high-cost patients in 17 acute-care hospitals.


Abstract

To assess the potential impact of national "catastrophic" health insurance on the medical-care system, the frequency and clinical characteristics of high-cost patients were surveyed at 17 acute-care hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area. The percentage of patients whose yearly hospital charges exceeded $4000 in 1976 ranged from 4 at a community hospital to 24 at a referral hospital. Hospital costs charged to these patients ranged from 20 to 68 per cent of total billings, with the highest percentages generally occurring at large referral hospitals. Forty-seven per cent of adult high-cost patients had chronic medical conditions, and only one in six suffered from an acute medical "catastrophe." In addition, more than 13 per cent of high-cost patients died in the hospital. National catastrophic health insurance is likely to pay for much chronic illness and terminal care and divert resources toward acute-care hospitals.

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ISSN
0028-4793
DOI
10.1056/NEJM197906073002304
pmid
440333

Abstract

To assess the potential impact of national "catastrophic" health insurance on the medical-care system, the frequency and clinical characteristics of high-cost patients were surveyed at 17 acute-care hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area. The percentage of patients whose yearly hospital charges exceeded $4000 in 1976 ranged from 4 at a community hospital to 24 at a referral hospital. Hospital costs charged to these patients ranged from 20 to 68 per cent of total billings, with the highest percentages generally occurring at large referral hospitals. Forty-seven per cent of adult high-cost patients had chronic medical conditions, and only one in six suffered from an acute medical "catastrophe." In addition, more than 13 per cent of high-cost patients died in the hospital. National catastrophic health insurance is likely to pay for much chronic illness and terminal care and divert resources toward acute-care hospitals.

Journal

The New England journal of medicinePubmed

Published: Jul 16, 1979

There are no references for this article.