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Frontal brain asymmetry predicts infants' response to maternal separation.

Frontal brain asymmetry predicts infants' response to maternal separation. Examined whether certain features of infant temperament might be related to individual differences in the asymmetry of resting frontal activation. EEG was recorded from the left and right frontal and parietal scalp regions of 13 normal 10-month-old infants. Infant behavior was then observed during a brief period of maternal separation. Those infants who cried in response to maternal separation showed greater right frontal activation during the preceding baseline period compared with infants who did not cry. Frontal activation asymmetry may be a state-independent marker for individual differences in threshold of reactivity to stressful events and vulnerability to particular emotions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of abnormal psychology Pubmed

Frontal brain asymmetry predicts infants' response to maternal separation.

Journal of abnormal psychology , Volume 98 (2): 5 – Jun 5, 1989

Frontal brain asymmetry predicts infants' response to maternal separation.


Abstract

Examined whether certain features of infant temperament might be related to individual differences in the asymmetry of resting frontal activation. EEG was recorded from the left and right frontal and parietal scalp regions of 13 normal 10-month-old infants. Infant behavior was then observed during a brief period of maternal separation. Those infants who cried in response to maternal separation showed greater right frontal activation during the preceding baseline period compared with infants who did not cry. Frontal activation asymmetry may be a state-independent marker for individual differences in threshold of reactivity to stressful events and vulnerability to particular emotions.

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ISSN
0021-843X
DOI
10.1037//0021-843x.98.2.127
pmid
2708653

Abstract

Examined whether certain features of infant temperament might be related to individual differences in the asymmetry of resting frontal activation. EEG was recorded from the left and right frontal and parietal scalp regions of 13 normal 10-month-old infants. Infant behavior was then observed during a brief period of maternal separation. Those infants who cried in response to maternal separation showed greater right frontal activation during the preceding baseline period compared with infants who did not cry. Frontal activation asymmetry may be a state-independent marker for individual differences in threshold of reactivity to stressful events and vulnerability to particular emotions.

Journal

Journal of abnormal psychologyPubmed

Published: Jun 5, 1989

There are no references for this article.