Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Propensity of white women in the United States to adopt children.

Propensity of white women in the United States to adopt children. Demographically, adoption is a relatively rare event. In 1982, only 2.3 per cent (or about 650,000) of ever-married white women aged 15 to 44 had adopted one or more children. Adoption is an important and very relevant means of family formation for many women, particularly those for whom biological childbearing is difficult or impossible. Although there is a modest literature on adoption behavior, we have very little information about women who have shown a propensity to adopt children. How should the phenomenon of adoption propensity be conceptualized? How many women are there in the United States with such a propensity? How different is this number from the number of women who eventually adopt children? What are the characteristics of women with a propensity to adopt? The objectives of this paper are (1) to estimate the numbers of U.S. women at three different points in time (1973, 1976, and 1982) who have a propensity to adopt, according to various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics; and (2) to compare via log-linear analysis the major characteristics of these women with women who have not shown such a propensity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social biology Pubmed

Propensity of white women in the United States to adopt children.

Social biology , Volume 36 (3-4): 19 – Apr 19, 1990

Propensity of white women in the United States to adopt children.


Abstract

Demographically, adoption is a relatively rare event. In 1982, only 2.3 per cent (or about 650,000) of ever-married white women aged 15 to 44 had adopted one or more children. Adoption is an important and very relevant means of family formation for many women, particularly those for whom biological childbearing is difficult or impossible. Although there is a modest literature on adoption behavior, we have very little information about women who have shown a propensity to adopt children. How should the phenomenon of adoption propensity be conceptualized? How many women are there in the United States with such a propensity? How different is this number from the number of women who eventually adopt children? What are the characteristics of women with a propensity to adopt? The objectives of this paper are (1) to estimate the numbers of U.S. women at three different points in time (1973, 1976, and 1982) who have a propensity to adopt, according to various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics; and (2) to compare via log-linear analysis the major characteristics of these women with women who have not shown such a propensity.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/propensity-of-white-women-in-the-united-states-to-adopt-children-X3HmA1EmVx

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
0037-766X
DOI
10.1080/19485565.1989.9988730
pmid
2629107

Abstract

Demographically, adoption is a relatively rare event. In 1982, only 2.3 per cent (or about 650,000) of ever-married white women aged 15 to 44 had adopted one or more children. Adoption is an important and very relevant means of family formation for many women, particularly those for whom biological childbearing is difficult or impossible. Although there is a modest literature on adoption behavior, we have very little information about women who have shown a propensity to adopt children. How should the phenomenon of adoption propensity be conceptualized? How many women are there in the United States with such a propensity? How different is this number from the number of women who eventually adopt children? What are the characteristics of women with a propensity to adopt? The objectives of this paper are (1) to estimate the numbers of U.S. women at three different points in time (1973, 1976, and 1982) who have a propensity to adopt, according to various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics; and (2) to compare via log-linear analysis the major characteristics of these women with women who have not shown such a propensity.

Journal

Social biologyPubmed

Published: Apr 19, 1990

There are no references for this article.