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Separate lives, different interests: male and female reproduction in the Gambia.

Separate lives, different interests: male and female reproduction in the Gambia. We report the initial findings of a research programme on the fertility and reproductive health of both men and women in rural Gambia. The reproductive experiences of men and women in the population studied were very different. During the period 1993-97, the total fertility rates were 12.0 for men and 6.8 for women. For men fertility began later, reached higher levels and continued into older ages than for women. Through serial and polygynous marriages, men were able to extend their reproduction beyond what would be possible with one woman. Of the married men interviewed, 40% were married polygynously. Men's fertility preferences indicated that they recognized their reproductive potentials to be greater than those of their individual wives. On average, married men desired 15.2 children for themselves and 7.3 for each wife. In this polygynous population the means available for attaining reproductive goals were different for the two sexes, depending on the separate lives and different interests of men and women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the World Health Organization Pubmed

Separate lives, different interests: male and female reproduction in the Gambia.

Bulletin of the World Health Organization , Volume 78 (5): -560 – Jul 19, 2000

Separate lives, different interests: male and female reproduction in the Gambia.


Abstract

We report the initial findings of a research programme on the fertility and reproductive health of both men and women in rural Gambia. The reproductive experiences of men and women in the population studied were very different. During the period 1993-97, the total fertility rates were 12.0 for men and 6.8 for women. For men fertility began later, reached higher levels and continued into older ages than for women. Through serial and polygynous marriages, men were able to extend their reproduction beyond what would be possible with one woman. Of the married men interviewed, 40% were married polygynously. Men's fertility preferences indicated that they recognized their reproductive potentials to be greater than those of their individual wives. On average, married men desired 15.2 children for themselves and 7.3 for each wife. In this polygynous population the means available for attaining reproductive goals were different for the two sexes, depending on the separate lives and different interests of men and women.

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ISSN
0042-9686
pmid
10859851

Abstract

We report the initial findings of a research programme on the fertility and reproductive health of both men and women in rural Gambia. The reproductive experiences of men and women in the population studied were very different. During the period 1993-97, the total fertility rates were 12.0 for men and 6.8 for women. For men fertility began later, reached higher levels and continued into older ages than for women. Through serial and polygynous marriages, men were able to extend their reproduction beyond what would be possible with one woman. Of the married men interviewed, 40% were married polygynously. Men's fertility preferences indicated that they recognized their reproductive potentials to be greater than those of their individual wives. On average, married men desired 15.2 children for themselves and 7.3 for each wife. In this polygynous population the means available for attaining reproductive goals were different for the two sexes, depending on the separate lives and different interests of men and women.

Journal

Bulletin of the World Health OrganizationPubmed

Published: Jul 19, 2000

There are no references for this article.