Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

[What are affects?].

[What are affects?]. In an attempt to answer the question, "what is affect?", this paper considers Freud's metapsychological formulation in the light of recent developments in psychoanalysis and neuroscience. It argues that the problem of affect-perhaps more than any other-forces us to acknowledge the intrinsic connexion between mind and body, and to accommodate it in our theoretical formulations. A review of the problem from this point of view leads to the following formulation: affect is a primary sensory modality, analogous to the senses of vision, hearing, somatic sensation, taste, and smell. These modalities are the elementary constituents of the envelope of consciousness, from which it is impossible to free ourselves. Whereas the sensory modalities of vision, hearing, somatic sensation, taste, and smell represent aspects of the external object world ("unknowable" in itself), affect is the primary sensory modality through which we perceive as aspect of the internal world of the subject ("unconscious" in itself). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psyche Pubmed

[What are affects?].

Psyche , Volume 50 (6): 38 – Nov 4, 1996

[What are affects?].


Abstract

In an attempt to answer the question, "what is affect?", this paper considers Freud's metapsychological formulation in the light of recent developments in psychoanalysis and neuroscience. It argues that the problem of affect-perhaps more than any other-forces us to acknowledge the intrinsic connexion between mind and body, and to accommodate it in our theoretical formulations. A review of the problem from this point of view leads to the following formulation: affect is a primary sensory modality, analogous to the senses of vision, hearing, somatic sensation, taste, and smell. These modalities are the elementary constituents of the envelope of consciousness, from which it is impossible to free ourselves. Whereas the sensory modalities of vision, hearing, somatic sensation, taste, and smell represent aspects of the external object world ("unknowable" in itself), affect is the primary sensory modality through which we perceive as aspect of the internal world of the subject ("unconscious" in itself).

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/what-are-affects-tXzR33QjxZ

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
0033-2623
pmid
8767233

Abstract

In an attempt to answer the question, "what is affect?", this paper considers Freud's metapsychological formulation in the light of recent developments in psychoanalysis and neuroscience. It argues that the problem of affect-perhaps more than any other-forces us to acknowledge the intrinsic connexion between mind and body, and to accommodate it in our theoretical formulations. A review of the problem from this point of view leads to the following formulation: affect is a primary sensory modality, analogous to the senses of vision, hearing, somatic sensation, taste, and smell. These modalities are the elementary constituents of the envelope of consciousness, from which it is impossible to free ourselves. Whereas the sensory modalities of vision, hearing, somatic sensation, taste, and smell represent aspects of the external object world ("unknowable" in itself), affect is the primary sensory modality through which we perceive as aspect of the internal world of the subject ("unconscious" in itself).

Journal

PsychePubmed

Published: Nov 4, 1996

There are no references for this article.