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A counter-narrative of a ‘failed’ interview

A counter-narrative of a ‘failed’ interview In a broader research project about students’ perceptions of their rightsin New Zealand high schools, the first author conducted an interview with a group ofstudents that was noticeably different from her interviews with groups of studentsat three other high schools. This article was prompted in the first instance by asense of this ‘noticeably different’ interview being a‘failure’ because of the limited spoken text elicited. In thisarticle we demonstrate what we can learn from data regarding embodiment, theinterview setting, silence, laughter and, in the process, we attempt to practise‘uncomfortable reflexivities’ advocated by Pillow (2003). Weargue that an apparently ‘failed’ interview has a great deal toteach us about the theory and practice of qualitative research and the tenuousnature of the production of knowledge. We finish by identifying how our experienceof this ‘failed’ interview informs our current research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qualitative Research SAGE

A counter-narrative of a ‘failed’ interview

Qualitative Research , Volume 5 (2): 24 – May 1, 2005

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References (35)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1468-7941
eISSN
1741-3109
DOI
10.1177/1468794105050836
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In a broader research project about students’ perceptions of their rightsin New Zealand high schools, the first author conducted an interview with a group ofstudents that was noticeably different from her interviews with groups of studentsat three other high schools. This article was prompted in the first instance by asense of this ‘noticeably different’ interview being a‘failure’ because of the limited spoken text elicited. In thisarticle we demonstrate what we can learn from data regarding embodiment, theinterview setting, silence, laughter and, in the process, we attempt to practise‘uncomfortable reflexivities’ advocated by Pillow (2003). Weargue that an apparently ‘failed’ interview has a great deal toteach us about the theory and practice of qualitative research and the tenuousnature of the production of knowledge. We finish by identifying how our experienceof this ‘failed’ interview informs our current research.

Journal

Qualitative ResearchSAGE

Published: May 1, 2005

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