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A Descriptive Model of Desistance From Sexual Offending

A Descriptive Model of Desistance From Sexual Offending Despite an increasing interest in desistance from sexual offending, a comprehensive theoretical account of the process has yet to be provided. This study examines the narratives of 60 men interviewed in the community, who were incarcerated for sexual offenses and released. Recent findings from this research conclude that men desist from sexual offending, but they seldom follow the processes described by traditional criminology. In many cases, in fact, they desist in spite of their inability to pursue Sampson and Laub’s “informal social controls” or Giordano et al.’s “hooks for change.” The relentless impact of current public policies such as community notification and electronic monitoring further impedes their likelihood of experiencing Maruna’s “Pygmalion effect” or achieving true cognitive transformation or agentic change. The descriptive model introduced here identifies four styles of desistance from sexual offending: “age,” “resignation,” “rote,” and “resilience.” Relevant implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology SAGE

A Descriptive Model of Desistance From Sexual Offending

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References (27)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2016
ISSN
0306-624X
eISSN
1552-6933
DOI
10.1177/0306624X16668176
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite an increasing interest in desistance from sexual offending, a comprehensive theoretical account of the process has yet to be provided. This study examines the narratives of 60 men interviewed in the community, who were incarcerated for sexual offenses and released. Recent findings from this research conclude that men desist from sexual offending, but they seldom follow the processes described by traditional criminology. In many cases, in fact, they desist in spite of their inability to pursue Sampson and Laub’s “informal social controls” or Giordano et al.’s “hooks for change.” The relentless impact of current public policies such as community notification and electronic monitoring further impedes their likelihood of experiencing Maruna’s “Pygmalion effect” or achieving true cognitive transformation or agentic change. The descriptive model introduced here identifies four styles of desistance from sexual offending: “age,” “resignation,” “rote,” and “resilience.” Relevant implications are discussed.

Journal

International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative CriminologySAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2016

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