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A Humanizing Pedagogy

A Humanizing Pedagogy Chapter 4 A Humanizing Pedagogy: Reinventing the Principles and Practice of Education as a Journey Toward Liberation Mar Ía del CarMen Salazar University of Denver I went to school with all of my treasures, including my Spanish language, Mexican culture, familia (family), and ways of knowing. I abandoned my treasures at the classroom door in exchange for English and the U.S. culture; consequently, my assimilation into U.S. society was agonizing. One of my earliest memories is of wishing away my dark skin; I wanted desperately to be White, and I abhorred being la morena, the dark-skinned girl. I came to associate white- ness with success and brownness with failure. I was overwhelmed with feelings of shame over the most essential elements of my humanness. As a result, my experience in the U.S. educa- tional system was marked by endless struggles to preserve my humanity. —María del Carmen Salazar InTR oduCTIon: THE nEEd foR HumAnIz ATIon In EduCATIon The preceding epigraph captures my experience as a hyphenated American navigating the hybrid space (Bhabha, 1994; Calabrese Barton, Tan, & Rivet, 2008; Gutiérrez, Baquedano-Lopez, & Tejeda, 1999) between my Mexican and U.S. cultures. My educational experience was marked by a deep sense http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Research in Education SAGE

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References (116)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2013 AERA
ISSN
0091-732X
eISSN
1935-1038
DOI
10.3102/0091732X12464032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 4 A Humanizing Pedagogy: Reinventing the Principles and Practice of Education as a Journey Toward Liberation Mar Ía del CarMen Salazar University of Denver I went to school with all of my treasures, including my Spanish language, Mexican culture, familia (family), and ways of knowing. I abandoned my treasures at the classroom door in exchange for English and the U.S. culture; consequently, my assimilation into U.S. society was agonizing. One of my earliest memories is of wishing away my dark skin; I wanted desperately to be White, and I abhorred being la morena, the dark-skinned girl. I came to associate white- ness with success and brownness with failure. I was overwhelmed with feelings of shame over the most essential elements of my humanness. As a result, my experience in the U.S. educa- tional system was marked by endless struggles to preserve my humanity. —María del Carmen Salazar InTR oduCTIon: THE nEEd foR HumAnIz ATIon In EduCATIon The preceding epigraph captures my experience as a hyphenated American navigating the hybrid space (Bhabha, 1994; Calabrese Barton, Tan, & Rivet, 2008; Gutiérrez, Baquedano-Lopez, & Tejeda, 1999) between my Mexican and U.S. cultures. My educational experience was marked by a deep sense

Journal

Review of Research in EducationSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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