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A Model of Person-Environment Compatibility

A Model of Person-Environment Compatibility The patterns of information available in the environment are often ignored in analyses of the fit or congruence between person and environment. By viewing such information patterns (in conjunction with the environmental constraints on behavior and the individual's purposes) as potential sources of incompatibility, it is possible to understand a substantially wider range of human-environment relationships. From this perspective, person-environment incompatibility turns out to be a problem that is widespread and that extracts high psychological costs. It might seem that the solution to such problems requires an increase in environmental controllability; such an assumption can, however, be questioned on a number of grounds. An alternative approach is proposed in terms of the concepts of supportive and restorative environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environment and Behavior SAGE

A Model of Person-Environment Compatibility

Environment and Behavior , Volume 15 (3): 22 – May 1, 1983

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References (23)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0013-9165
eISSN
1552-390X
DOI
10.1177/0013916583153003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The patterns of information available in the environment are often ignored in analyses of the fit or congruence between person and environment. By viewing such information patterns (in conjunction with the environmental constraints on behavior and the individual's purposes) as potential sources of incompatibility, it is possible to understand a substantially wider range of human-environment relationships. From this perspective, person-environment incompatibility turns out to be a problem that is widespread and that extracts high psychological costs. It might seem that the solution to such problems requires an increase in environmental controllability; such an assumption can, however, be questioned on a number of grounds. An alternative approach is proposed in terms of the concepts of supportive and restorative environments.

Journal

Environment and BehaviorSAGE

Published: May 1, 1983

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