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Afrocentricity and African Spirituality

Afrocentricity and African Spirituality 10.1177/002193402237226 JOURNAL Mazama / AFRICAN OFBLACK SPIRITUALITY STUDIES / NOVEMBER 2002 AFROCENTRICITY AND AFRICAN SPIRITUALITY MAMBO AMA MAZAMA Temple University In this article, the author seeks to argue in support of the African ontological view as a valid way to view the world. Indeed, the argument in this work is that a central role of Afrocentric philosophy ought to be the reestablishment of the process by which Africans arrive at spirituality. Demonstrating that Christianity has often been the culprit behind White supremacy, the author suggests that it has gone hand-in-hand with the desacralization of African culture. Although Afrocentricity has been mostly analyzed as an intellec- tual idea whose main tenet is the centrality of the African experi- ence for African people, be it historical or cultural (Mazama, 2001), I would like to argue in this article that Afrocentricity can certainly not be reduced to an epistemological project. It cannot, and certainly should not, in my view, be approached simply as an analytical tool. In fact, it is precisely such a reduction that has allowed some to believe that they could be Afrocentric some times and then something else at other times, as if being Afrocentric could be a part-time http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Black Studies SAGE

Afrocentricity and African Spirituality

Journal of Black Studies , Volume 33 (2): 17 – Nov 1, 2002

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References (25)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0021-9347
eISSN
1552-4566
DOI
10.1177/002193402237226
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

10.1177/002193402237226 JOURNAL Mazama / AFRICAN OFBLACK SPIRITUALITY STUDIES / NOVEMBER 2002 AFROCENTRICITY AND AFRICAN SPIRITUALITY MAMBO AMA MAZAMA Temple University In this article, the author seeks to argue in support of the African ontological view as a valid way to view the world. Indeed, the argument in this work is that a central role of Afrocentric philosophy ought to be the reestablishment of the process by which Africans arrive at spirituality. Demonstrating that Christianity has often been the culprit behind White supremacy, the author suggests that it has gone hand-in-hand with the desacralization of African culture. Although Afrocentricity has been mostly analyzed as an intellec- tual idea whose main tenet is the centrality of the African experi- ence for African people, be it historical or cultural (Mazama, 2001), I would like to argue in this article that Afrocentricity can certainly not be reduced to an epistemological project. It cannot, and certainly should not, in my view, be approached simply as an analytical tool. In fact, it is precisely such a reduction that has allowed some to believe that they could be Afrocentric some times and then something else at other times, as if being Afrocentric could be a part-time

Journal

Journal of Black StudiesSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2002

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