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Book Review

Book Review Book Reviews field notes. Moreover, the book boasts a level of descriptive detail that is too seldom in In found ethnographic texts. fact, if the book has a notable flaw, it can be found in Fine's re- luctance to push past the details and raise the broader socio- logical questions prompted by the study. For example, the cooks Fine studied (and, indeed, cooks in general) hailed from the working class. How, then, do these individuals de- velop the cultural capital demanded of haut cuisine? Is the occupation stratified along class lines, or does some sort of social acculturation take Such are not place? questions raised, much less answered. In one sense, this show of re- straint is laudable. As essentially exploratory research, this study's chief objective is to know better the phenomenon chosen for not to make examination, sweeping generaliza- tions or broad theoretical statements, although it is also likely to leave sociologists with an interest in such questions unsatisfied. But perhaps it is the nature of all good books to leave one with appetite whetted and hungry for more. This is certainly the case with Kitchens. Bonalyn J. Nelsen Assistant Professor of Organization Studies Johnson Graduate School of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Administrative Science Quarterly SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1999 Johnson Graduate School, Cornell University
ISSN
0001-8392
eISSN
1930-3815
DOI
10.2307/2667045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews field notes. Moreover, the book boasts a level of descriptive detail that is too seldom in In found ethnographic texts. fact, if the book has a notable flaw, it can be found in Fine's re- luctance to push past the details and raise the broader socio- logical questions prompted by the study. For example, the cooks Fine studied (and, indeed, cooks in general) hailed from the working class. How, then, do these individuals de- velop the cultural capital demanded of haut cuisine? Is the occupation stratified along class lines, or does some sort of social acculturation take Such are not place? questions raised, much less answered. In one sense, this show of re- straint is laudable. As essentially exploratory research, this study's chief objective is to know better the phenomenon chosen for not to make examination, sweeping generaliza- tions or broad theoretical statements, although it is also likely to leave sociologists with an interest in such questions unsatisfied. But perhaps it is the nature of all good books to leave one with appetite whetted and hungry for more. This is certainly the case with Kitchens. Bonalyn J. Nelsen Assistant Professor of Organization Studies Johnson Graduate School of

Journal

Administrative Science QuarterlySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1999

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