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Book Review: Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of American Education

Book Review: Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of American Education 410 INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW instrumentalist. His starting point is his end­ infer. It relates, also, the need to extend ing point as well, for the final chapter of the schooling as children were prohibited from working early in this century, a fact which book does not attempt to derive from the case gave rise to the high school as an integral part studies any coherent and carefully developed of the educational system. As women began to theoretical lessons. be educated in mass, efforts were made to There was one issue that the author raised revise curricula to prepare them for marriage on several occasions in the book that I found and motherhood, a role that many women, intriguing. This had to do with what Roosens themselves, thought was their only one. For­ takes to be the universal appeal on the part of tunately, a few women were brave enough and marginal and/or non-Western peoples for showed enough foresight to fight against the Western technology, products and values. I tide and demand an equal and completely suspect that sustained inquiry would actually liberal education which set the tone for the discover a more ambivalent and complicated quality education women may now achieve. situation, but this is an important issue that These conditions, among others cited in the deserves far more scholarly attention than it text, support a main theme-that education has received to date. Roosens can be thanked has traditionally yielded to the demands of for highlighting this. It is regrettable that, like social, political and economic situations and, so many other issues in the book, the whether good or bad, the schools have re­ pastichelike manner in which this topic is pre­ sponded. It gives hope to the thought that the sented works against the author's desire to educational system will be able to respond provide a compelling argument. positively to its current problems and the in­ flux of different groups of immigrants. Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of The description ofthe public high schools in American Education. By Paula S. Fass. New New York City is most thorough and was York: Oxford University Press, 1989. Pp. chosen because that city had representative 308. $24.95 immigrant groups the first half of the twenti­ eth century. However, at that time, the JUNE GRANT population ofthe United States was still mostly Trinity University rural instead of the highly urbanized situation that existed in New York City. One wonders This thoroughly researched volume traces the if the high schools in large cities were repre­ course of American education from the nine­ sentative of the nation or just isolated teenth century to the mid-twentieth century instances. with detailed attention to the influences of The flow of the book is difficult if the reader various "outside influences." Although the is to benefit from the valuable notes at the back book is a general survey, the author supports of the book. Likewise, the appendices add her contentions by focusing on certain minor­ important explanations and data. Any reader ity groups: European immigrants, women who wants to ruminate on the current educa­ (their education), blacks and Catholics. In tional scene as a consequence of its past using these diverse minority groups, each of history will appreciate this well-written, well­ which is "outside" the mainstream, she lends researched book. a global aspect to the thesis of the book, the influence of various minority groups on the trends in the insistent devotion to the Ameri­ Emigrants and Society:Extremadura and America can democratic principle of educating all ofits in the Sixteenth Century. By Ida Altman. citizens. Berkeley: University of California Press, In contrast to the many critical reports of 1989. Pp. 372. current American education and the sug­ gested reforms, this account relates how much ASUNCION LAVRIN such practices as using IQ scores as barome­ Howard University ters of students' accomplishments brought about the marriage of "science" to education Despite its obvious interest as an historical and its deleterious effects on immigrants and subject, few scholars have explored the migra­ blacks. The fact that such practices, or compa­ tory movement of Spanish settlers to the New rable devices, still exist is left to the reader to World during the sixteenth century. Even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Review SAGE

Book Review: Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of American Education

International Migration Review , Volume 25 (2): 1 – Jun 1, 1991

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References (2)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1991 Center for Migration Studies
ISSN
0197-9183
eISSN
1747-7379
DOI
10.1177/019791839102500210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

410 INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW instrumentalist. His starting point is his end­ infer. It relates, also, the need to extend ing point as well, for the final chapter of the schooling as children were prohibited from working early in this century, a fact which book does not attempt to derive from the case gave rise to the high school as an integral part studies any coherent and carefully developed of the educational system. As women began to theoretical lessons. be educated in mass, efforts were made to There was one issue that the author raised revise curricula to prepare them for marriage on several occasions in the book that I found and motherhood, a role that many women, intriguing. This had to do with what Roosens themselves, thought was their only one. For­ takes to be the universal appeal on the part of tunately, a few women were brave enough and marginal and/or non-Western peoples for showed enough foresight to fight against the Western technology, products and values. I tide and demand an equal and completely suspect that sustained inquiry would actually liberal education which set the tone for the discover a more ambivalent and complicated quality education women may now achieve. situation, but this is an important issue that These conditions, among others cited in the deserves far more scholarly attention than it text, support a main theme-that education has received to date. Roosens can be thanked has traditionally yielded to the demands of for highlighting this. It is regrettable that, like social, political and economic situations and, so many other issues in the book, the whether good or bad, the schools have re­ pastichelike manner in which this topic is pre­ sponded. It gives hope to the thought that the sented works against the author's desire to educational system will be able to respond provide a compelling argument. positively to its current problems and the in­ flux of different groups of immigrants. Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of The description ofthe public high schools in American Education. By Paula S. Fass. New New York City is most thorough and was York: Oxford University Press, 1989. Pp. chosen because that city had representative 308. $24.95 immigrant groups the first half of the twenti­ eth century. However, at that time, the JUNE GRANT population ofthe United States was still mostly Trinity University rural instead of the highly urbanized situation that existed in New York City. One wonders This thoroughly researched volume traces the if the high schools in large cities were repre­ course of American education from the nine­ sentative of the nation or just isolated teenth century to the mid-twentieth century instances. with detailed attention to the influences of The flow of the book is difficult if the reader various "outside influences." Although the is to benefit from the valuable notes at the back book is a general survey, the author supports of the book. Likewise, the appendices add her contentions by focusing on certain minor­ important explanations and data. Any reader ity groups: European immigrants, women who wants to ruminate on the current educa­ (their education), blacks and Catholics. In tional scene as a consequence of its past using these diverse minority groups, each of history will appreciate this well-written, well­ which is "outside" the mainstream, she lends researched book. a global aspect to the thesis of the book, the influence of various minority groups on the trends in the insistent devotion to the Ameri­ Emigrants and Society:Extremadura and America can democratic principle of educating all ofits in the Sixteenth Century. By Ida Altman. citizens. Berkeley: University of California Press, In contrast to the many critical reports of 1989. Pp. 372. current American education and the sug­ gested reforms, this account relates how much ASUNCION LAVRIN such practices as using IQ scores as barome­ Howard University ters of students' accomplishments brought about the marriage of "science" to education Despite its obvious interest as an historical and its deleterious effects on immigrants and subject, few scholars have explored the migra­ blacks. The fact that such practices, or compa­ tory movement of Spanish settlers to the New rable devices, still exist is left to the reader to World during the sixteenth century. Even

Journal

International Migration ReviewSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 1991

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