Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Changes in Functional Competency in the Oldest Old

Changes in Functional Competency in the Oldest Old Changes in everyday functioning and cognitive abilities are studied longitudinally in a representative sample of the oldest old. Respondents were selected by using census records from all people aged 84, 86, 88, and 90 years old living in an area of South Central Sweden, and then were assessed at 2-year intervals. The findings show high base rates for disabilities and high incidence of cognitive and functional deficits among survivors. Mortality is associated with higher rates of disability at the previous time of assessment. Because of this increased mortality rate among disabled individuals, prevalence does not rise as much as would be expected from the high incidence. Instead, new cases of disabled are partly replacing disabled individuals who died since the previous evaluation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aging and Health SAGE

Changes in Functional Competency in the Oldest Old

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/changes-in-functional-competency-in-the-oldest-old-NfJ93K0B5b

References (24)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0898-2643
eISSN
1552-6887
DOI
10.1177/089826439500700101
pmid
10172778
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Changes in everyday functioning and cognitive abilities are studied longitudinally in a representative sample of the oldest old. Respondents were selected by using census records from all people aged 84, 86, 88, and 90 years old living in an area of South Central Sweden, and then were assessed at 2-year intervals. The findings show high base rates for disabilities and high incidence of cognitive and functional deficits among survivors. Mortality is associated with higher rates of disability at the previous time of assessment. Because of this increased mortality rate among disabled individuals, prevalence does not rise as much as would be expected from the high incidence. Instead, new cases of disabled are partly replacing disabled individuals who died since the previous evaluation.

Journal

Journal of Aging and HealthSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.