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Changing Flags: Naturalization and its Determinants among Mexican Immigrants1

Changing Flags: Naturalization and its Determinants among Mexican Immigrants1 This article presents a secondary analysis of citizenship acquisition among legal Mexican immigrants who arrived in the United States during the early 1970s. A large array of individual characteristics found to be significant in previous studies, such as age, occupation, income and length of residence in the United States, are found not to correlate with an interest in naturalization. Instead, positive correlations are found with three general themes combining several characteristics. These are: roots in the United States, such as home ownership and number of children; residential patterns, both in Mexico and the ethnicity of the neighborhood in the United States; and the barriers and attitudes faced during periods of legal residence, such as type of immigrant visa and discrimination faced in the United States. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Review SAGE

Changing Flags: Naturalization and its Determinants among Mexican Immigrants1

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References (15)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1987 Center for Migration Studies
ISSN
0197-9183
eISSN
1747-7379
DOI
10.1177/019791838702100206
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article presents a secondary analysis of citizenship acquisition among legal Mexican immigrants who arrived in the United States during the early 1970s. A large array of individual characteristics found to be significant in previous studies, such as age, occupation, income and length of residence in the United States, are found not to correlate with an interest in naturalization. Instead, positive correlations are found with three general themes combining several characteristics. These are: roots in the United States, such as home ownership and number of children; residential patterns, both in Mexico and the ethnicity of the neighborhood in the United States; and the barriers and attitudes faced during periods of legal residence, such as type of immigrant visa and discrimination faced in the United States.

Journal

International Migration ReviewSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 1987

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