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Chapter 3: Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal With Multiple Implications

Chapter 3: Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal With Multiple Implications Chapter 3 Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal With Multiple Implications JOHN D. BRANSFORD AND DANIEL L. SCHWARTZ Vanderbilt University A belief in transfer lies at the heart of our educational system. Most educators want learning activities to have positive effects that extend beyond the exact conditions of initial learning. They are hopeful that students will show evidence of transfer in a variety of situations: from one problem to another within a course, from one course to another, from one school year to the next, and from their years in school to their years in the workplace. Beliefs about transfer often accompany the claim that it is better to ' 'educate'' people broadly than simply to "train" them to perform particular tasks (e.g., Broudy, 1977). In this chapter, we discuss research on transfer from both a retrospective and a prospective perspective. What has past transfer research taught us that is especially important for education? What might research on transfer look like in the future? Our discussion of past research is brief, not because it is unimportant but because of space limitations and the fact that our primary emphasis is on the future. We argue that prevailing theories and methods of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Research in Education SAGE

Chapter 3: Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal With Multiple Implications

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References (105)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0091-732X
eISSN
1935-1038
DOI
10.3102/0091732X024001061
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 3 Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal With Multiple Implications JOHN D. BRANSFORD AND DANIEL L. SCHWARTZ Vanderbilt University A belief in transfer lies at the heart of our educational system. Most educators want learning activities to have positive effects that extend beyond the exact conditions of initial learning. They are hopeful that students will show evidence of transfer in a variety of situations: from one problem to another within a course, from one course to another, from one school year to the next, and from their years in school to their years in the workplace. Beliefs about transfer often accompany the claim that it is better to ' 'educate'' people broadly than simply to "train" them to perform particular tasks (e.g., Broudy, 1977). In this chapter, we discuss research on transfer from both a retrospective and a prospective perspective. What has past transfer research taught us that is especially important for education? What might research on transfer look like in the future? Our discussion of past research is brief, not because it is unimportant but because of space limitations and the fact that our primary emphasis is on the future. We argue that prevailing theories and methods of

Journal

Review of Research in EducationSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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