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Confession Evidence

Confession Evidence Confession evidence is powerful but flawed, often in nonintuitive ways. Contradicting widely held beliefs, research reviewed in this article suggests the following: Despite special training in how to conduct interviews, police cannot distinguish better than the layperson whether suspects are lying or telling the truth. Suspects in custody routinely waive their self-protective rights to silence and to counsel—especially if they are innocent. Certain legal but deceptive interrogation tactics increase the risk that innocents will confess to crimes they did not commit. Judges and juries are easily fooled, unable to distinguish between true and false confessions. Appellate courts cannot be expected to reasonably determine whether the error of admitting a coerced confession at trial was harmless or prejudicial. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Criminal Justice and Behavior SAGE

Confession Evidence

Criminal Justice and Behavior , Volume 35 (10): 14 – Oct 1, 2008

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References (91)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0093-8548
eISSN
1552-3594
DOI
10.1177/0093854808321557
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Confession evidence is powerful but flawed, often in nonintuitive ways. Contradicting widely held beliefs, research reviewed in this article suggests the following: Despite special training in how to conduct interviews, police cannot distinguish better than the layperson whether suspects are lying or telling the truth. Suspects in custody routinely waive their self-protective rights to silence and to counsel—especially if they are innocent. Certain legal but deceptive interrogation tactics increase the risk that innocents will confess to crimes they did not commit. Judges and juries are easily fooled, unable to distinguish between true and false confessions. Appellate courts cannot be expected to reasonably determine whether the error of admitting a coerced confession at trial was harmless or prejudicial.

Journal

Criminal Justice and BehaviorSAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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