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Constructing the Self and Changing Others: Reconsidering `Normative Power Europe'

Constructing the Self and Changing Others: Reconsidering `Normative Power Europe' The European Union (EU) is widely seen as a novel kind of actor in international politics. This has been captured succinctly by Ian Manner's term `normative power Europe'. This article reviews the literature on the concept of normative power and relates it to the earlier literature on civilian power. It argues that these concepts of power should be seen as part of the same discourse; a discourse which is not confined to the EU, but includes the cases of other great powers, such as the United States (US). The example of the US leads to a problematisation of `normative power Europe' that does not focus on the discrepancy between rhetoric and concrete policies, or on the inconsistencies of EU policies, but on the political effects of the construction of the EU as a normative power; i.e., on the power of the `normative power Europe' discourse. With illustrations drawn from the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership, Turkey-EU relations and the sanctions against Austria, I argue that this discourse establishes a particular identity for the EU through turning third parties into `others' and representing the EU as a positive force in world politics. The article concludes with a call for more reflexivity in the representation of the EU as a normative power. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Millennium: Journal of International Studies SAGE

Constructing the Self and Changing Others: Reconsidering `Normative Power Europe'

Millennium: Journal of International Studies , Volume 33 (3): 24 – Jun 1, 2005

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References (12)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0305-8298
eISSN
1477-9021
DOI
10.1177/03058298050330031701
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The European Union (EU) is widely seen as a novel kind of actor in international politics. This has been captured succinctly by Ian Manner's term `normative power Europe'. This article reviews the literature on the concept of normative power and relates it to the earlier literature on civilian power. It argues that these concepts of power should be seen as part of the same discourse; a discourse which is not confined to the EU, but includes the cases of other great powers, such as the United States (US). The example of the US leads to a problematisation of `normative power Europe' that does not focus on the discrepancy between rhetoric and concrete policies, or on the inconsistencies of EU policies, but on the political effects of the construction of the EU as a normative power; i.e., on the power of the `normative power Europe' discourse. With illustrations drawn from the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership, Turkey-EU relations and the sanctions against Austria, I argue that this discourse establishes a particular identity for the EU through turning third parties into `others' and representing the EU as a positive force in world politics. The article concludes with a call for more reflexivity in the representation of the EU as a normative power.

Journal

Millennium: Journal of International StudiesSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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