Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cultural Criminology:

Cultural Criminology: SPECIAL ISSUE Theoretical Criminology © 2004 SAGE Publications London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi. www.sagepublications.com Vol. 8(3): 259–273; 1362–4806 DOI: 10.1177/1362480604044608 Some notes on the script KEITH J. HAYWARD AND JOCK YOUNG University of Kent, UK and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, USA Introduction Let us start with a question: what is this phenomenon called ‘cultural criminology’? Above all else, it is the placing of crime and its control in the context of culture; that is, viewing both crime and the agencies of control as cultural products—as creative constructs. As such, they must be read in terms of the meanings they carry. Furthermore, cultural criminology seeks to highlight the interaction between these two elements: the relationship and the interaction between constructions upwards and constructions downwards. Its focus is always upon the continuous generation of meaning around interaction; rules created, rules broken, a constant interplay of moral entrepreneurship, moral innovation and transgression. Going further still, it strives to place this interplay deep within the vast proliferation of media images of crime and deviance, where every facet of offending is reflected in a vast hall of mirrors (see Ferrell, 1999). It attempts to make sense of a world http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Theoretical Criminology: An International Journal SAGE

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/cultural-criminology-EtCxMOptV1

References (44)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1362-4806
eISSN
1461-7439
DOI
10.1177/1362480604044608
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SPECIAL ISSUE Theoretical Criminology © 2004 SAGE Publications London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi. www.sagepublications.com Vol. 8(3): 259–273; 1362–4806 DOI: 10.1177/1362480604044608 Some notes on the script KEITH J. HAYWARD AND JOCK YOUNG University of Kent, UK and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, USA Introduction Let us start with a question: what is this phenomenon called ‘cultural criminology’? Above all else, it is the placing of crime and its control in the context of culture; that is, viewing both crime and the agencies of control as cultural products—as creative constructs. As such, they must be read in terms of the meanings they carry. Furthermore, cultural criminology seeks to highlight the interaction between these two elements: the relationship and the interaction between constructions upwards and constructions downwards. Its focus is always upon the continuous generation of meaning around interaction; rules created, rules broken, a constant interplay of moral entrepreneurship, moral innovation and transgression. Going further still, it strives to place this interplay deep within the vast proliferation of media images of crime and deviance, where every facet of offending is reflected in a vast hall of mirrors (see Ferrell, 1999). It attempts to make sense of a world

Journal

Theoretical Criminology: An International JournalSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.