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Depression among Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American Family Caregivers

Depression among Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American Family Caregivers This study compared depressive symptoms among Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American female family caregivers of older persons with dementia. The sample included Korean caregivers living in Seoul, Korea (KK); Korean American (KA) caregivers living in the Chicago and Los Angeles areas; and Caucasian American (CA) caregivers from the Chicago metropolitan area. KK caregivers were more likely to be daughters-in-law, KA caregivers were more likely to be daughters, and CA caregivers were more likely to be wives or daughters. Overall, wives were more depressed than daughters and daughters-in-law. KK caregivers were the most depressed of the three cultural groups. When caregiver relationship and cultural group were examined simultaneously, KK and KA wives were most depressed, and KA daughters-in-law were least depressed. Differences in culture and social role appeared to affect depressive symptoms among these caregivers. The findings suggest a need to further examine the associations between caregivers’ relationships with their care recipients and their own emotional status. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Transcultural Nursing: A Forum for Cultural Competence in Health Care SAGE

Depression among Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American Family Caregivers

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References (36)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1043-6596
eISSN
1552-7832
DOI
10.1177/1043659603260010
pmid
14768412
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study compared depressive symptoms among Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American female family caregivers of older persons with dementia. The sample included Korean caregivers living in Seoul, Korea (KK); Korean American (KA) caregivers living in the Chicago and Los Angeles areas; and Caucasian American (CA) caregivers from the Chicago metropolitan area. KK caregivers were more likely to be daughters-in-law, KA caregivers were more likely to be daughters, and CA caregivers were more likely to be wives or daughters. Overall, wives were more depressed than daughters and daughters-in-law. KK caregivers were the most depressed of the three cultural groups. When caregiver relationship and cultural group were examined simultaneously, KK and KA wives were most depressed, and KA daughters-in-law were least depressed. Differences in culture and social role appeared to affect depressive symptoms among these caregivers. The findings suggest a need to further examine the associations between caregivers’ relationships with their care recipients and their own emotional status.

Journal

Journal of Transcultural Nursing: A Forum for Cultural Competence in Health CareSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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