Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Duration of Party Control in Parliamentary and Presidential Governments

Duration of Party Control in Parliamentary and Presidential Governments Most of the previous work on political stability uses cabinet duration or leadership duration to measure stability. This study, however, focuses on another area of stability, namely the party control of the executive branch. This approach not only allows us to compare political durability in presidential and parliamentary systems directly, but it also, we believe, better reflects policy changes that stem from government party composition. Our analysis of longitudinal data from 65 democracies reveals that presidential and parliamentary governments create different patterns of government survival. Ruling parties in parliamentary systems encounter a declining hazard rate over time, whereas those in presidentialism face an increasing hazard rate in their survival. We explain this difference by focusing on how parliamentary and presidential systems create different incentive structures for political parties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Political Studies SAGE

Duration of Party Control in Parliamentary and Presidential Governments

Comparative Political Studies , Volume 39 (3): 23 – Apr 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/duration-of-party-control-in-parliamentary-and-presidential-6MXyvRnvBr

References (38)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0010-4140
eISSN
1552-3829
DOI
10.1177/0010414005284047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most of the previous work on political stability uses cabinet duration or leadership duration to measure stability. This study, however, focuses on another area of stability, namely the party control of the executive branch. This approach not only allows us to compare political durability in presidential and parliamentary systems directly, but it also, we believe, better reflects policy changes that stem from government party composition. Our analysis of longitudinal data from 65 democracies reveals that presidential and parliamentary governments create different patterns of government survival. Ruling parties in parliamentary systems encounter a declining hazard rate over time, whereas those in presidentialism face an increasing hazard rate in their survival. We explain this difference by focusing on how parliamentary and presidential systems create different incentive structures for political parties.

Journal

Comparative Political StudiesSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 2006

There are no references for this article.