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Empathological Places: Residents' Ambivalence toward Remaining in Public Housing

Empathological Places: Residents' Ambivalence toward Remaining in Public Housing It is often assumed that most residents of large public housing projects in America's inner cities would welcome the opportunity to leave such places. This study, based on indepth interviews with 267 residents of five public housing developments in Boston, examines the reasons why two-thirds of these respondents say they would like to stay put, and also discusses the factors that make the other one-third eager to depart. The article concludes by attempting to reconcile these findings with a central dilemma facing urban planners and housing policymakers: how to sustain stable communities in public housing while also increasing the opportunities for residents to move to less impoverished neighborhoods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Planning Education and Research SAGE

Empathological Places: Residents' Ambivalence toward Remaining in Public Housing

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References (12)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0739-456X
eISSN
1552-6577
DOI
10.1177/0739456X9701600301
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is often assumed that most residents of large public housing projects in America's inner cities would welcome the opportunity to leave such places. This study, based on indepth interviews with 267 residents of five public housing developments in Boston, examines the reasons why two-thirds of these respondents say they would like to stay put, and also discusses the factors that make the other one-third eager to depart. The article concludes by attempting to reconcile these findings with a central dilemma facing urban planners and housing policymakers: how to sustain stable communities in public housing while also increasing the opportunities for residents to move to less impoverished neighborhoods.

Journal

Journal of Planning Education and ResearchSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1997

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