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Examining Transformational Resistance Through a Critical Race and Latcrit Theory Framework

Examining Transformational Resistance Through a Critical Race and Latcrit Theory Framework Using critical race theory and Latina/Latino critical race theory as a framework, this article utilizes the methods of qualitative inquiry and counterstorytelling to examine the construct of student resistance. The authors use two events in Chicana/Chicano student history—the 1968 East Los Angeles school walkouts and the 1993 UCLA student strike for Chicana and Chicano studies. Using these two methods and events, the authors extend the concept of resistance to focus on its transformative potential and its internal and external dimensions. The authors describe and analyze a series of individual and focus group interviews with women who participated in the 1968 East Los Angeles high school walkouts. The article then introduces a counterstory that briefly listens in on a dialogue between two data-driven composite characters, the Professor and an undergraduate student named Gloria. These characters’ experiences further illuminate the concepts of internal and external transformational resistance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Education SAGE

Examining Transformational Resistance Through a Critical Race and Latcrit Theory Framework

Urban Education , Volume 36 (3): 35 – May 1, 2001

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References (86)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0042-0859
eISSN
1552-8340
DOI
10.1177/0042085901363002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using critical race theory and Latina/Latino critical race theory as a framework, this article utilizes the methods of qualitative inquiry and counterstorytelling to examine the construct of student resistance. The authors use two events in Chicana/Chicano student history—the 1968 East Los Angeles school walkouts and the 1993 UCLA student strike for Chicana and Chicano studies. Using these two methods and events, the authors extend the concept of resistance to focus on its transformative potential and its internal and external dimensions. The authors describe and analyze a series of individual and focus group interviews with women who participated in the 1968 East Los Angeles high school walkouts. The article then introduces a counterstory that briefly listens in on a dialogue between two data-driven composite characters, the Professor and an undergraduate student named Gloria. These characters’ experiences further illuminate the concepts of internal and external transformational resistance.

Journal

Urban EducationSAGE

Published: May 1, 2001

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