Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Explaining access to citizenship in Europe: How citizenship policies affect naturalization rates

Explaining access to citizenship in Europe: How citizenship policies affect naturalization rates In Europe, a variety of national policies regulate access to citizenship. This article analyses how citizenship policies affect naturalization rates among immigrants. Our analysis confirms that favourable citizenship policies positively affect naturalization rates, especially among first-generation immigrants with more than 5 but fewer than 20 years of residence. However, most variation is explained by other factors. Immigrants from poor, politically unstable, and non-EU countries are more likely to be a citizen of their European country of residence. Other important predictors of the citizenship status of immigrants are language, years of residence (first generation), and age (second generation). Explanations of naturalization rates in Europe should not only take into account institutional conditions but also include other destination and origin country factors and individual characteristics of immigrants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Union Politics SAGE

Explaining access to citizenship in Europe: How citizenship policies affect naturalization rates

European Union Politics , Volume 13 (3): 23 – Sep 1, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/explaining-access-to-citizenship-in-europe-how-citizenship-policies-KnwazB1uRC

References (55)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav
ISSN
1465-1165
eISSN
1741-2757
DOI
10.1177/1465116512440510
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Europe, a variety of national policies regulate access to citizenship. This article analyses how citizenship policies affect naturalization rates among immigrants. Our analysis confirms that favourable citizenship policies positively affect naturalization rates, especially among first-generation immigrants with more than 5 but fewer than 20 years of residence. However, most variation is explained by other factors. Immigrants from poor, politically unstable, and non-EU countries are more likely to be a citizen of their European country of residence. Other important predictors of the citizenship status of immigrants are language, years of residence (first generation), and age (second generation). Explanations of naturalization rates in Europe should not only take into account institutional conditions but also include other destination and origin country factors and individual characteristics of immigrants.

Journal

European Union PoliticsSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.