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Explaining Immigrant Naturalization1

Explaining Immigrant Naturalization1 Prior research on immigrant naturalization has focused mainly on the effects of immigrants’ adaptation experiences and demographic characteristics on their propensity to naturalize. This article proposes a broader analytical framework which incorporates immigrants’ individual characteristics and larger social contexts in the country of origin and the country of destination to explain the likelihood of citizenship acquisition. The framework is tested for a cohort of recent immigrants, using the PUMS data from the 1980 U.S. census. The results show that economic, political, social, cultural and geographical conditions in the country of origin, and immigrants ethnic communities and urban concentration in the country of destination, to a large extent influence immigrants’ propensity for naturalization and that, net of the contextual factors, many of the immigrants’ adaptation and demographic characteristics are also significant predictors of citizenship acquisition. The costs, benefits and meaning of naturalization and their intervening roles in the naturalization process are also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Review SAGE

Explaining Immigrant Naturalization1

International Migration Review , Volume 28 (3): 29 – Sep 1, 1994

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References (39)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1994 Center for Migration Studies
ISSN
0197-9183
eISSN
1747-7379
DOI
10.1177/019791839402800302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prior research on immigrant naturalization has focused mainly on the effects of immigrants’ adaptation experiences and demographic characteristics on their propensity to naturalize. This article proposes a broader analytical framework which incorporates immigrants’ individual characteristics and larger social contexts in the country of origin and the country of destination to explain the likelihood of citizenship acquisition. The framework is tested for a cohort of recent immigrants, using the PUMS data from the 1980 U.S. census. The results show that economic, political, social, cultural and geographical conditions in the country of origin, and immigrants ethnic communities and urban concentration in the country of destination, to a large extent influence immigrants’ propensity for naturalization and that, net of the contextual factors, many of the immigrants’ adaptation and demographic characteristics are also significant predictors of citizenship acquisition. The costs, benefits and meaning of naturalization and their intervening roles in the naturalization process are also discussed.

Journal

International Migration ReviewSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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